Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Summit on Aquaculture & Fisheries Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

  • Advances in Aquaculture Nutrition
Speaker
Biography:

Bilikis Iyabo Uneke holds a Ph.D in Fisheries Biology. She is a leading researcher and lecturer in the Department of Biological Sciences, Ebonyi State University, Nigeria. In the last ten years, her work as focused on aquaculture, stock assessment, modeling, fisheries management and policy. She has worked extensively on the food, feeding habits and nutrient requirements of teleost fishes of the inland waters of southeastern Nigeria

Abstract:

The requirement of African catfish, Heterobranchus longifilis for dietary was determined. Two hundred and seventy fingerlings samples of H. longifilis (mean weight 2.3±0.1g) were stocked in eighteen (18) plastic bowls, each of 25 litres capacity at a density of 15 fish samples per bowl. Zinc sulphate of 0.1%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0% and 0.0% were assigned randomly to the water baths which were designated as D1, D2, D3, D4, D5 and D6 respectively and each with three replicates. The fish samples were fed at 5% body weight per day thrice daily at 8:00hrs, 12:00hrs and 16hrs. Water in experimental bowls was changed weekly. Fish weights were taken fortnightly and feed were adjusted (to maintain it at a constant 5% of the body weight of fish). The result showed that the performance of fish diets with different levels of zinc sulphate was significantly different (P = 0.05) between treatments. Fish fed diet 1.5% of zinc sulphate inclusion level performed significantly better than the ones fed with the other diets. Fish fed with 2.0% zinc sulphate inclusion level showed high Food Conversion Ratio (FCR) indicating that when the optimum dietary requirement of zinc is exceeded, it can adversely affect the feed conversion ability of the fish, resulting in poor weight gain. Hence, zinc should be included in the diet of fish at the required level to avoid adverse effect which could be harmful not only to the organism but to tertiary consumer (Human beings).  

Mahmoud Hafezieh

Iranian Fisheries Sciences Research Institute(IFSRI), Agricultural Research, Education & extension Organization- Iran

Title: Water Stability and Floatation Test of Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannameii) Pellets Using Brown Seaweed Powder (Sargassum ilicifolium)
Speaker
Biography:

Mahmoud Hafezieh has his expertise in Aquaculture technology on fish and shellfish nutrition and their live food. He is working Iranian  fisheries Sciences research institute Also he is as a scientific staff of AZAD university in Tehran and during his 23 years work,  he published more than 40 Scientific articles base on his research projects, Also published 7 Books specifically live food and inert food in aquaculture. recently he focused on seaweed as ingredients in fish and shrimp food which this article is a part of one.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Shrimp food factory in Iran used high amounts of chemical binders which is not environment friendly.

The purpose of this study is binding effect of Sargassum ilicifolium on Litopenaeus vannamei pellets.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Shrimp feed bound with a brown seaweed, Sargassum ilicifolium powder replaced at three level with protein resources in laboratory. Treatments were incorporated at zero (used 2% formaldehyde sorbate=FS), 5, 10 and 15% level of seaweed while in the commercial feed(CF) pellet which used a chemical binders routine in shrimp feed factory. After 30 minutes of exposure to sea water (equal to the Oman Sea water, 33 ppt salinity).Findings: 15% treatment maintained a 25% pellets afloat while zero treatment had the least. There was a difference in the percentage number of pellets afloat between 5 minutes and 30 minutes of exposure to water (P<0.05). There was also a difference in the water stability of the different levels seaweed used (P<0.05).

Conclusion & Significance: 15% treatment had the highest water stability (57.70±1.60) after 50 minutes of exposure to water.

  • Diseases in Aquaculture

Session Introduction

Nyan Taw

Former Chief Technical Advisor & Consultant for FAO of the UN and Consultant for World Bank Projects, Malaysia.

Title: Sustainable Shrimp Farming in Biosecure RAS and Biofloc Technology: Commercial Experience and Approaches to Disease Control-Malaysia
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Nyan Taw received his Ph.D. from the University of Tasmania, Australia. He served as short term consultant for FAO and World Bank funded projects in Saudi Arabia and Vietnam. He was a technical counter-part for ADB and JICA projects to develop the fisheries sector in Myanmar from 1976 to 1987. In 1988, he joined the FAO of the UN and served in aquaculture projects in Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines culminating the position of CTA. From 1995, Dr Nyan served as Production Director at several locations in Indonesia. In 2002, he joined CP Indonesia, as VP where he initiated bio-floc technology. Later he served as SVP for Dipasena Group, Indonesia. He served Blue Archipelago as GM and developed a bio-secure, modular RAS system shrimp farm from 2009 to 2015 in Malaysia. He has provided consultancy for shrimp farming companies in South & Central America, Middle East and Asia He conducted Shrimp Biofloc Technology workshops for shrimp farmers in Malaysia, Australia, India, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, Thailand & Myanmar. He co-authored a chapter in the book by Avnimelech on Biofloc Technology (2012 & 14).

Abstract:

Biosecure Biofloc technology applied in shrimp farming is adapted from the basic minimum water exchange shrimp intensive culture system used in Indonesia since early late 1990s. The system then was to position aerators within culture ponds to concentrate waste (sludge) into centre of ponds which were then siphon out physically or through central drain system. The aerators were operated almost 24 hours to have optimum culture pond environmental condition. The system creates clean water column and bottom feeding area and separated the sludge area (Taw, 2005; 2015, Taw, et al 2007). Shrimp bio-floc system is somewhat an upgraded system by introducing carbon such as molasses and wheat flour to develop a heterotrophic environment with zero water exchange which suspend bio-floc colony within pond water column. The bio-floc system is developed by developing algae first and later cross over to bio-floc to have self-nitrification process sets in (Taw 2014). Main economic benefits of shrimp bio-floc system are – better biosecurity, low FCR, higher production, higher energy efficiency and sustainable production. Biofloc system alone cannot prevent ever emerging shrimp diseases. However, bio-floc and bio-secure shrimp farm design, construction and operation system have shown to prevent diseases entering the farm facilities (Taw 2005; Taw et al 2008, & Taw & Setio 2014).  In Malaysia bio-secure modular RAS system with bio-floc technology has been applied at Blue Archipelago shrimp farm since October 2011 and has been operating successfully without any incident of EMS/AHPND which was a major threat to China, Vietnam, Malaysia and Thailand (Taw, et al. 2013 & Taw 2014).  According to In-Kwon (2012 &2014) there were more than 2,000 bacterial species in well-developed bio-floc water. This bio-floc may enhance immune activity based on mRNA expression of six immune-related genes – ProPO1, ProPO2, PPAE, ran, mas and SP1. A study at Bogor University, Indonesia and Ghent University, Belgium revealed that bio-floc system contributes to the enhancement of immune response and survival after IMNV challenge regardless the carbon source. The application of BFT brings about beneficial effect in disease control and management in shrimp culture (Ekasari, et al., 2014).

  • Aquaculture Technology and Engineering Applications
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. C.A. Saclauso is a Professor and Dean of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences of the University of the Philippines Visayas, Miagao, Iloilo, Philippines. His interest is on trophic ecology of fish particularly, the interaction of feeding and social behavior with growth. His early work on cage culture of milkfish in marine waters provided opportunity in addressing stock density-dependent growth leading to the concept of bottom feeding. This paved the way for the development of the hydro-kinetic bottom feeder that improves feed access of fish in high density culture.  Dr. J.D. Toledo was formerly the Chief of SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department in the Philippines. He is presently the Technical Director of Feedmix Specialists Inc II at Pulilan, Bulacan, Philippines. His interest is on the reproductive biology of fish and in improving efficiency of operations for sustainable and profitable aquaculture production.

Abstract:

High density stocking often results in slow growth and low survival in aquaculture. This is attributed to diminished space, inequitable access to food, and aggressive behavior as a consequence of crowding and deterioration of water quality at high population densities. Under crowded conditions, aggression depresses growth that results in the deaths of subordinate conspecifics. In non-aggressive species like milkfish, crowding significantly affects size variance hypothesized to have been caused by reduced food access in high density culture where fish are fed from the top.  

The study aims to improve yield and profitability of milkfish production in high density culture through bottom feeding. With increased density, yield per unit volume is also expected to increase thus diminish the area required in generating equivalent production at lower stock densities.  

Milkfish at densities of 50 pieces m-3, 75 pieces m-3 and 100 pieces m-3 were reared for 120 days in replicated 5mx5mx5m floating net cages in a marine cove with a depth of 10 m and a flow rate of 8 cm sec -1. Fish were fed floating pellets through top demand feeder and hydro-kinetic bottom feeder.

Bottom feeding increased production of milkfish cultured at very high density.  Net yield (kg m-3) increased by 75% with the doubling of stocking density from 50 m-3 to 100 m-3. Size variance was reduced and condition index (K) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were improved. Bottom feeding optimizes food utilization through equitable and better access to food hence, reduces feed wastage. Bottom feeding and high density stocking enhances production efficiency without compromising environmental integrity.

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Muhammad Usman, Former Director General of Agricultural Research System, Government of Pakistan who retired from service after a spotless career of about 35 years with senior level experience on research and development of integrated agricultural industries with regard to livestock and dairy development, poultry, aquaculture and fishery, apiculture, sustainable agricultural production system, fruits and vegetable, seed production, bioenergy and other cash crops.Mr. Usman is basically an agricultural scientist with specialization of agricultural/ chemistry working as plant breeder with regard to the yield and quality of various agricultural crops, released several varieties, presented and published research papers on crops and renewable energy in the different conferences like Geneva.Mr. Usman established “Prominent Agro Based Industries SDN BHD” in Malaysia and “Foundation for Rural Development in Pakistan”, with primarily aims to work on integrated agricultural project for Rural Development through improvement in agriculture for rehabilitation of affected area.

Abstract:

The aims of presentation consist of aquaculture, fishery and poverty were studied to find out the role of aquaculture and fishery industries on the poverty alleviation of South Asia like Pakistan. Aquaculture means the fish or shellfish farming-refers to breading, rearing and harvesting of plants and animals in all types of water environments including ponds, river, lakes and the ocean. Researcher and aquaculture producers are "farming" all kinds of freshwater and marine species of fish, shellfish, and plants.  Aquaculture consists of two types. Marin Aquaculture refers to the culturing species that lives in the ocean and consist of sea ranching, surface lines, sub-surface lines, rack, sea cages, pond and hatcheries. Freshwater aquaculture is the culture of aquatic species within and dependent on fresh water environment. The objective of the aquaculture is the production of protein rich, nutritive, palatable and easily digestible human food at reasonable cost, production of sport fish, baitfish, ornamental fish, industrial fish. Research work conducted showed that showed that 85% fish productions are in sea marine and only 5% are in water growers commercially. The production of the different fish like sport, bait, ornamental, industrial, black tilapia, red tilapia, hybrid tilapia, black prawn, rid prawn are good food items and plays an important role in nutrition and health of aged people. Aquaculture provides protein rich food which are more efficient than other animals. It is concluded that improving aquaculture and fishery is the most powerful tool for absorbing millions of technical and non-technical people, increase income, create employment, the cheapest source of quality food which will consequently reduce poverty and without it life is almost impossible.

N. R. Chatterjee

West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences, Kolkata, India

Title: Title: Technology Development and its Dissemination in Aquaculture Sector
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Chatterjee developed various innovative technology in Aquaculture and published more than 50 papers in reputed international journals. In 2015 he was awarded Honorary fellow by the Singapore Institute of Aquaculture. His book on “Induced Fish Breeding “published in 25th Oct. by Elsevier. Prof. Chatterjee is member and advisor of many academic body at national and international level.

Abstract:

World aquaculture production continues to grow, albeit at a slowing rate. According to the latest available statistics collected globally by FAO, world aquaculture production attained another all-time high of 90.4 million tonnes (live weight equivalent) in 2012 (US$144.4 billion), including 66.6 million tonnes of food fish (US$137.7 billion) and 23.8 million tonnes of aquatic algae (mostly seaweeds, US$6.4 billion). In this context, India is the second largest producer of fish and the second largest producer of fresh water fish in the world. Fishery plays an important role in contribution of rural economy and nutritional security. It has the highest contribution in agricultural GDP among all the allied fields of agriculture. But there is a severe concern gets highlighted when the per-capita fish availability is compared with its recommended level and production level is compared with the demand. A sharp gap can be identified, especially in case of aquaculture production which demands technological interventions to meet up this gap. The latest technological developments in fisheries sector offers better prospects for all sections of rural people particularly for those who have poor land base and abundant labour force. Despite significant advancement of fisheries sector there is still moderate to low adoption of modern fisheries production technologies.  There are considerable evidences which suggest that non-adoption of recommended technologies is often related to non-technological factors, such as social, psychological, cultural and economic factors. These barriers can only be solved by successful implementation of different fisheries development programmes. Several studies indicated that lack of adequate planning and continual evaluation is a major reason for the failure of the development of projects and extension activities (FAO,1996). Therefore, development of sustainable technologies for Aquaculture practices and effective extension communication strategies are needed. In recent years, there has been growing dissatisfaction with the poor rates of adoption of aquaculture technologies in resource-poor farming systems.  This poor adoption has resulted partly because when aquaculture technologies are developed, there is little input from farmers.  Participatory Technology Development (PTD) offers a way forward, through active, decision-making involvement of farmers in every stage of technology development. When new technology is being developed, researchers usually control all steps of the process. The Participatory Technology Development (PTD) approach involves farmer’s right from the beginning, when they are asked to identify their problems.

  • Biotechnology and Genetics in Aquaculture
Speaker
Biography:

Isagani P. Angeles Jr, Ph.D. is a registered Fisheries Technologist in the Philippines and a Professor/Director in the Provincial Institute of Fisheries (PIF), Isabela State University, Isabela, Philippines. He obtained his Ph.D. in Aquaculture in the Department of Aquaculture, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan in 2015. He is the Project Leader in several research studies on the Development of Aqua Feed Diet and Alternative Technology on Tilapia and Prawn Production funded by ISU and Department of Science and Technology. His expertise encompasses the field of aquaculture management, particularly on feed and nutrition and fish/shellfish immunology.

Abstract:

The study evaluated the growth, haematology, glucose and  resistance to ammonia stress of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus fed diets supplemented with different antioxidants. The fish were fed diet containing 80 mg kg-1astaxanthin (AX80), 50 g kg-1 malunggay Moringa oleifera (MO50) and 5 g kg-1 nutrafito plus (NP5) or basal diet (C) for 42 d. Weight sampling was conducted every 14 d while survival was monitored daily. Blood was collected to determine the haematological parameters and blood glucose level of fish before and after ammonia stress test. Wf, WG and SGR of NP5-fish were significantly higher than C-fish but comparable to AX80- and MO50-fish. However, other parameters such as PER and FCR were not significantly different among all treatments. There were significant results on some haematological parameters, Gluc level and survival before and after ammonia stress. Before ammonia stress, RBC of NP5-fish was significantly higher among treatments while HCT of NP5-fish was significantly higher than MO50-fish. After ammonia stress, HGB of AX80-fish was significantly higher than C-fish but comparable to MO50- and NP5-fish. On the other hand, RBC of NP5-fish was significantly higher than MO50- and C-fish. Moreover, HCT of NP5-fish was significantly higher than C-fish. Gluc level of NP5 was the lowest among treatments. In addition, AX80- and NP5-fish showed significantly higher survival than to the C-fish. These results indicated that fish fed diet supplemented with Nutra fit plus improved growth performance, stabilize some haematological parameters and glucose level and improved survival of O. niloticus exposed to ammonia stress.

Sadiqul Awal

School of Food, Plant and Animal Industries, Melbourne Polytechnic, Victoria Australia

Title: Reclamation of salt affected soils and production of microalgae biomass for commercial purposes.
Speaker
Biography:

Sadiqul Awal has completed his PhD at the age of 40 years from Deakin University Victoria Australia. He is currently working as a lecturer at Melbourne Polytechnic, Victoria Australia. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as reviewer in many journals. His research interest in aquaculture in inland ground saline water, microalgae, and estuarine environmental management.

Abstract:

 

The issue of the salinization of Australia’s inland ground water is a recurring and major environmental problem that is often the result of previous uses of the land for agricultural purposes and the use of certain irrigation practices. Inundation of land by saline water for long periods leads to its percolation into the surrounding soils, resulting in altered soil chemistry. Prolonged inundation inhibits the fixation of free nitrogen and halts mineralization, thus impairing soil fertility within a few years. The elevation of a water table that features increased salinity levels (sometimes approaching or even exceeding that of seawater) means that while the environmental ramifications are potentially massive (and include crop damage), it is true also that such waters are an untapped and largely unexplored aquatic resource. It is no doubt true that such inland areas present a wonderful opportunity to farm a variety of fish, molluscs and crustaceans (an opportunity that has thus far been realised on a relatively very small scale), but there is no doubt considerable scope to grow microalgae, which underpin the bottom of the food chain in aquatic systems and have an enormous number of potential uses. Microalgae are potentially ideal candidates for remediation of these salt affected soil and lands. Microalgae can be deployed for bioremediation at sites with highly variable salinities, without significant effects on end-product potential.

 

  • Aquatic Resources & Environment Management

Session Introduction

M. Golam Mortuza

Department of Zoology, Faculty of Life and Earth Science, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh

Title: The Effect of Sewage Discharge on the Fish Faunal Diversity of Wadi Hanifah, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Speaker
Biography:

 M. Golam Mortuza is currently working as a Professor at University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. He received his BSc and MSc in 1987 and 1988 respectively from University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. He did his Doctor of Science (DSc) degree from Hiroshima University, Japan in 2005. He worked at Pusan National University as Postdoctoral Researcher in 2008-2009. During his postdoctoral research, his work has been patent registered in the Korean Intellectual Property Office.  In 2011, Dr. Mortuza accepted a Professor position at King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where he was working on Environmental pollution and health risk assessment using fish. His research tropic addresses aquatic pollution and risk assessment, fish ecology, behaviour and systematic study of fish, floodplain fisheries. Dr. Mortuza also associate Research member with two other foreign University. Mortuza has over 50 refereed and ISI publications. Dr. Mortuza has also published a book chapter with other renounced authors in “Surface water photochemistry” Royal Society of Chemistry, London, 2015.

Abstract:

Effluent discharges from industries and municipal sewage from the city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and adjacent areas are partially carried out through a stream channel known as Wadi Hanifah. At present the main sources of water are sewage effluent, agricultural runoff, pumped shallow ground water from the city of Riyadh and seasonal rainwater. Monthly samples were collected from three sampling area (Namar, Al-Azizia and Al-Hair) from Wadi Hanifah during September 2014 to August 2015. Results indicated that the industrial and municipal effluent impacted negatively on water quality and consequently the fish community structure. A total of 17 fish species were recorded throughout the year with the lowest number of 11 species recorded in the most impacted Al-Azizia area. Species richness indices were highest at the Namar dam (recreation park area) and lowest at Al-Azizia, the most affected area, where vehicle mechanical industries are established and petrochemicals are damping through sewerage channels. Tilapia is dominating species in Wadi Hanifah especially at recreation park area, where fish species are culturing, while carp’s species are found throughout the channel. Due to high petrochemical pollution, dead fishes are usually found at Al-Azizia site. Low dissolved oxygen, pH, secchi depth and high electrical conductivity, total phosphorous, and total nitrogen, heavy metals were strongly associated with the effluent impacted sites and greatly influenced the fish community structure. This study recommends the use of fish as valuable biological indicators in aquatic environmental pollution assessment.

Speaker
Biography:

 M. Golam Mortuza is currently working as a Professor at University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. He received his BSc and MSc in 1987 and 1988 respectively from University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. He did his Doctor of Science (DSc) degree from Hiroshima University, Japan in 2005. He worked at Pusan National University as Postdoctoral Researcher in 2008-2009. During his postdoctoral research, his work has been patent registered in the Korean Intellectual Property Office.  In 2011, Dr. Mortuza accepted a Professor position at King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where he was working on Environmental pollution and health risk assessment using fish. His research tropic addresses aquatic pollution and risk assessment, fish ecology, behaviour and systematic study of fish, floodplain fisheries. Dr. Mortuza also associate Research member with two other foreign University. Mortuza has over 50 refereed and ISI publications. Dr. Mortuza has also published a book chapter with other renounced authors in “Surface water photochemistry” Royal Society of Chemistry, London, 2015.

Abstract:

The study was carried out to assess surface water quality of Rajshahi City of Bangladesh. Based on surveys and chemical analyses, we performed a case study of the surface water collected from three different areas, in order to understand the sources of water pollution and the evolution of water quality in Rajshahi City, Bangladesh. Concentrations of major chemical elements in the surface water were related to the source of the agricultural, industrial and municipal sewerage. The Padma river bank close to the city side was more polluted by the domestic and sewerage system than that of opposite side.