Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Summit on Aquaculture & Fisheries Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

  • Advances in Aquaculture Nutrition
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Nchumbeni Humtsoe obtained her Ph.D. Degree from University of Mumbai, India on the topic  “Growth performance and biochemical composition of Labeo rohita to feed containing Katelysia opima and Nerita species,” and completed a course on “Professional planning and development programme in fisheries” from CIFE, Kolkatta, India . She had represented scientist team from India and attended 7th Indo-Pacific fish Conference at Taiwan and presented a paper on topic, “Effect of arsenic on the enzymes of freshwater fish Labeo Rohita” which was published in reputed international journal. She had presented research papers on several national conferences. She is a competent researcher and can work well in team with good communication skill and tackle any challenges positively. She is specialized in fish nutrition and feeding technologies. She is a life member of Indian Fisheries Association since 2008 and currently working as a Fishery Inspector in the Department of Fisheries, Government of Nagaland, India.

Abstract:

A six months feeding experiment was conducted to evaluate the incorporation of five feed ingredients with the flesh of Nerita species in the diet of Labeo rohita. Fingerlings of Labeo rohita weighing 2-4 gm were divided into six groups and fed with prepared feeds using five different feed ingredients such as ground nut oil cake, tapioca flour, rice bran and wheat flour along with different levels of the flesh of Nerita species as experimental diets. A control group of rohus fingerlings was maintained on pelleted feed without adding the flesh of Nerita species. Fishes were fed twice daily with the respective test diets at the rate of 4% body weight during entire culture period of three months. Results regarding growth performance of L.rohita fingerlings fed on different experimental diets showed that the best growth performance of fish in terms of percentage live weight gain was noted as 131.68 % where as 46.60 % was noted with control diet which is prepared without adding the flesh of Nerita species . Maximum increase in length (2.90cm) was noticed in the fingerlings fed with highest level of the flesh of Nerita species compared to minimum increase in length (1.33 cm). Specific Growth Rate (SGR) per day of fish fed on different experimental diets was noted in the range of 0.22 - 0.61 percentage compared to control diet which was noted as 0.28 percentage. The feed conversion ratio observed 4.417 was highest in fish fed with highest level of the flesh of Nerita species compared to fish fed on control diet which is noted as 4.032. This study reveals that incorporation of the flesh of Nerita species  in different feed ingredients  is one of the best animal proteins in terms of growth and feed conversion which is optimum for growth of Labeo rohita.

Speaker
Biography:

Bilikis Iyabo Uneke holds a Ph.D in Fisheries Biology. She is a leading researcher and lecturer in the Department of Biological Sciences, Ebonyi State University, Nigeria. In the last ten years, her work as focused on aquaculture, stock assessment, modeling, fisheries management and policy. She has worked extensively on the food, feeding habits and nutrient requirements of teleost fishes of the inland waters of southeastern Nigeria

Abstract:

The requirement of African catfish, Heterobranchus longifilis for dietary was determined. Two hundred and seventy fingerlings samples of H. longifilis (mean weight 2.3±0.1g) were stocked in eighteen (18) plastic bowls, each of 25 litres capacity at a density of 15 fish samples per bowl. Zinc sulphate of 0.1%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0% and 0.0% were assigned randomly to the water baths which were designated as D1, D2, D3, D4, D5 and D6 respectively and each with three replicates. The fish samples were fed at 5% body weight per day thrice daily at 8:00hrs, 12:00hrs and 16hrs. Water in experimental bowls was changed weekly. Fish weights were taken fortnightly and feed were adjusted (to maintain it at a constant 5% of the body weight of fish). The result showed that the performance of fish diets with different levels of zinc sulphate was significantly different (P = 0.05) between treatments. Fish fed diet 1.5% of zinc sulphate inclusion level performed significantly better than the ones fed with the other diets. Fish fed with 2.0% zinc sulphate inclusion level showed high Food Conversion Ratio (FCR) indicating that when the optimum dietary requirement of zinc is exceeded, it can adversely affect the feed conversion ability of the fish, resulting in poor weight gain. Hence, zinc should be included in the diet of fish at the required level to avoid adverse effect which could be harmful not only to the organism but to tertiary consumer (Human beings).  

Speaker
Biography:

A.T. Ramachandra Naik is Associate Professor, College of Fisheries, Mangalore 575002, Karnataka Veterinary, Animal and Fisheries Sciences University, India.

Abstract:

The freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii is a more popular crustacean cultured widely in monoculture system in India. It has got high nutritional value in the human diet. Hence, understanding its enzymatic and body composition is important in order to judge its flesh quality. Fish oil specially derived from Indian oil sardine is a good source of highly unsaturated fatty acid and lipid source in fish/prawn diet. A 35% crude protein diet with graded levels of Sardine oil as a source of fat was incorporated at four levels viz, 2.07, 4.07, 6.07 and 8.07% maintaining a total lipid level of feed at 8.11, 10.24, 12.28 and 14.33% respectively. Diet without sardine oil (6.05% total lipid) was served as basal treatment. The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii was used as test animal and the experiment was lost for 112 days. Significantly higher gain in weight of prawn was recorded in the treatment with 6.07% sardine oil incorporation followed by higher specific growth rate, food conversion rate and protein efficiency ratio. The 8.07% sardine oil diet produced the highest RNA:DNA ratio in the prawn muscle. Digestive enzyme analyses in the digestive tract and mid-gut gland showed the greatest activity in prawns fed the 8.07% diet.

Speaker
Biography:

Len S. Smith holds the position as Chief Business Officer of Heliae. Heliae is an applied microalgae research, development, products and technology provider based in Arizona, USA. Mr. Smith has been with Heliae since 2014. Prior to his current role at Heliae, he held management and leadership positions with leading biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in the USA.  He holds degrees in biology, environmental science, and business from leading US universities.

Abstract:

Omega-3 fatty acids, such as DHA and EPA, have been demonstrated to have critical roles in both fish and human nutrition.  Increasingly, fish products are sourced from farmed fish.  However, many farmed fish have been demonstrated to lack the omega-3 fatty acid content of typical wild fish counterparts.  Moreover, in a period where consumers increasingly wish to obtain healthy dietary components, such as DHA, from fish, as compared to from dietary supplements, the amount of DHA in fish has reportedly fallen.  Most omega-3 sources used in feed today are not efficient at achieving optimal DHA:EPA ratios as microalgal sources, as these traditionally used sources usually have relatively high amounts of EPA to DHA.  DHA-rich microalgae can provide an alternative tool for feed formulation, one that allows feed formulators a way to supply precise amounts of DHA into the feed.  In addition, the DHA in microalgae DHA is naturally encapsulated, providing a more stable source of DHA.  Heliae has sourced a novel DHA-rich microalgae and developed a production technology that will allow this product to be widely available to the aquaculture industry.

  • Diseases in Aquaculture

Session Introduction

Nyan Taw

Former Chief Technical Advisor & Consultant for FAO of the UN and Consultant for World Bank Projects, Malaysia.

Title: Sustainable Shrimp Farming in Biosecure RAS and Biofloc Technology: Commercial Experience and Approaches to Disease Control-Malaysia
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Nyan Taw received his Ph.D. from the University of Tasmania, Australia. He served as short term consultant for FAO and World Bank funded projects in Saudi Arabia and Vietnam. He was a technical counter-part for ADB and JICA projects to develop the fisheries sector in Myanmar from 1976 to 1987. In 1988, he joined the FAO of the UN and served in aquaculture projects in Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines culminating the position of CTA. From 1995, Dr Nyan served as Production Director at several locations in Indonesia. In 2002, he joined CP Indonesia, as VP where he initiated bio-floc technology. Later he served as SVP for Dipasena Group, Indonesia. He served Blue Archipelago as GM and developed a bio-secure, modular RAS system shrimp farm from 2009 to 2015 in Malaysia. He has provided consultancy for shrimp farming companies in South & Central America, Middle East and Asia He conducted Shrimp Biofloc Technology workshops for shrimp farmers in Malaysia, Australia, India, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, Thailand & Myanmar. He co-authored a chapter in the book by Avnimelech on Biofloc Technology (2012 & 14).

Abstract:

Biosecure Biofloc technology applied in shrimp farming is adapted from the basic minimum water exchange shrimp intensive culture system used in Indonesia since early late 1990s. The system then was to position aerators within culture ponds to concentrate waste (sludge) into centre of ponds which were then siphon out physically or through central drain system. The aerators were operated almost 24 hours to have optimum culture pond environmental condition. The system creates clean water column and bottom feeding area and separated the sludge area (Taw, 2005; 2015, Taw, et al 2007). Shrimp bio-floc system is somewhat an upgraded system by introducing carbon such as molasses and wheat flour to develop a heterotrophic environment with zero water exchange which suspend bio-floc colony within pond water column. The bio-floc system is developed by developing algae first and later cross over to bio-floc to have self-nitrification process sets in (Taw 2014). Main economic benefits of shrimp bio-floc system are – better biosecurity, low FCR, higher production, higher energy efficiency and sustainable production. Biofloc system alone cannot prevent ever emerging shrimp diseases. However, bio-floc and bio-secure shrimp farm design, construction and operation system have shown to prevent diseases entering the farm facilities (Taw 2005; Taw et al 2008, & Taw & Setio 2014).  In Malaysia bio-secure modular RAS system with bio-floc technology has been applied at Blue Archipelago shrimp farm since October 2011 and has been operating successfully without any incident of EMS/AHPND which was a major threat to China, Vietnam, Malaysia and Thailand (Taw, et al. 2013 & Taw 2014).  According to In-Kwon (2012 &2014) there were more than 2,000 bacterial species in well-developed bio-floc water. This bio-floc may enhance immune activity based on mRNA expression of six immune-related genes – ProPO1, ProPO2, PPAE, ran, mas and SP1. A study at Bogor University, Indonesia and Ghent University, Belgium revealed that bio-floc system contributes to the enhancement of immune response and survival after IMNV challenge regardless the carbon source. The application of BFT brings about beneficial effect in disease control and management in shrimp culture (Ekasari, et al., 2014).

  • Aquaculture Economics
Speaker
Biography:

José L. Fernández Sánchez is economist and professor of business economics and organization in the department of business administration at University of Cantabria (UC) in Santander (Spain). He also participates in the UC’s research group IDES. He gets a doctoral degree in Business Administration from University of Cantabria and two master degrees in Marketing (ESIC) and Economics (Queens College, CUNY). His research interests are related to corporate social responsibility, corporate reputation and strategy, as well as the sustainability of the primary sector and the food industry.

Abstract:

The purpose of this research is to analyze the effect that the market structure could have on the profit margins of the European (EU28) fish and seafood producers. This research employs the Structure–Conduct–Performance (SCP) paradigm to investigate the simultaneous relationship between price-cost margin (PCM), industrial concentration (IC), and technical efficiency (TE) in the European fish and seafood production industry. So, following Setiawan et al. (2013), the following non-recursive structural model can be formulated:

 

PCM = f (IC, TE, SIZE, GROWTH)

IC = g (PCM, GROWTH, CI)

TE = h (IC, SIZE)

 

This simultaneous system of equations has been estimated using the Full Information Maximum Likelihood (FIML) estimation method. Annual industry-macro data from different private and public sources (AMADEUS, STECF, and EUMOFA databases) for each of the EU28 countries during the period 2008–2013 has been employed to estimate the structural model parameters for the fishing and aquaculture sectors.

The findings about our structural model are presented in Table 1. So, a good fit of the whole model was obtained and estimation results are majorly in agreement with economic theory. The results show that market growth is negatively related to market concentration whereas capital intensity and the price-cost margin are positively related with industry concentration. Also, it has been found that higher industrial concentration leads to lower technical efficiency. On the other hand, technical efficiency is affected positively by the sector size (significance at the 1% level). Further, technical efficiency affects price-cost margin positively since technical efficiency lowers the per unit cost of production. Finally, industry concentration, technical efficiency, and market growth affect positively industry price-cost margins (at least, in the case of fishing sector, this effect has been statistically very significant) whereas industry size had a negative effect on the fish and seafood producers’ profit margins.

  • Aquaculture Technology and Engineering Applications
  • Biotechnology and Genetics in Aquaculture

Session Introduction

Anjanayappa, H. N

College of Fisheries, Mangalore- India

Title: Breeding Biology Of Priacanthus Hamrur (Forsskal) Off Mangalore Coast, Karnataka, India
Speaker
Biography:

I have 22 years of experience in teaching, research and extension in the field of Fisheries Resources and Management. The job involves principally, teaching the undergraduate (B.F.Sc) and postgraduate (M.F.Sc and Ph.D.) students, in Fisheries Resources and Management courses covering Fish population dynamics and stock assessment, Taxonomy of finfish and shellfish, Biodiversity of finfish and shellfish, Marine fishery resources, Anatomy, Physiology of finfish and shellfish, Biology of fish, Tropical fish stock assessment, Applications of fisheries models in stock assessment and Modern techniques in ichthyotaxonomy. Besides the job includes research work of applied nature related to fisheries resources, their abundance, distribution, assessment and management. In addition, an effective extension work in fisheries is undertaken as a tool of taking the message from lab to land. Popular articles, interviews through local electronic media etc are also undertaken for the benefit of fisherfolk.

Abstract:

Fishes of the family Priacanthidae, popularly called big eye or bulls eye. Priacanthus hamrur is an important deep-water inhabitant of great commercial value. High percentage of landings of Priancanthids used as raw material for surimi, sausage and other fishery by-products. Presently, it has great demand in Singapore Thailand, Taiwan, Hong Kong and other countries. For the maturation studies samples were collected from commercial landing centre, Mangalore. Studies on reproductive biology showed that Priacanthus hamrur spawns twice in a year, the spawning season extending from March to May and October to November. Based on the percentage occurrence of mature fishes in various size group it was inferred that male attained maturity at smaller size than female. This study will enable us to understand the spawning periodicity, cyclic morphological changes in male, female gonads and also it helps to improve stock size by enforcing fishing ban in particular season by assessing spawning periodicity.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Rajanna K.B. is an Assistant Professor at Fisheries Research and Information Centre (Inland), Hebbal, nataka Veterinary, Animal and Fisheries Sciences University. He has 8 years of service in the field of fisheries and aquaculture. Besides research, he is also involved in imparting training to the scientific and farming communities.

 

Abstract:

The ‘fringed - lipped’ peninsula carp Labeo fimbriatus (Bloch) is a potential and an abundant fish species of rivers and reservoirs of peninsular India. It contributes a part of inland fish production and also plays a role in rural economy in major carp deficient regions of India. The fish is locally called as “Kemmeenu” in Karnataka. Month wise samples were collected from the Vanivilasa Sagar Reservoir fish landing centre and fishing villages around the reservoir. For this study, a total of 1,126 specimens were examined during March, 2013 – February, 2014. Studies on the reproductive biology showed the occurrence of ripe gonads more during October, November, December and January. Thus it may be concluded that spawning season coinciding with monsoon season and the size at maturity was found to be 36 and 37 cm total length (M and F). Fecundity ranged from 63,897 to 5,10,824 with an average of 2,43,304 eggs and the predominance of female was reported. The pooled sex ratio (M: F) was found to be 1:1.09. This study will throw light on reproductive biology of fish for captive brood stock development, breeding and rearing of Labeo fimbriatus. Since this fish is commercial important the study would help to take up hatchery production.

  • Aquatic Resources & Environment Management
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Taoka has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from the United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Kagoshima University and postdoctoral studies from University of Miyazaki. He worked in a commercial fisheries company, Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd. as a researcher and arrived at present post in University of Miyazaki at 2011. Recently, he has focused on the production of functional substances from marine microbes and the utilization in the field of aquaculture.

Abstract:

World aquaculture production has continued to increase. Fishmeal is used as protein sources for aqua-feeds. However, the price is drastically increased to around 170,000/ ton in 2013 during recent 10 years because of the decrease of fish resources, anchovy. This is serious problem for sustainable aquaculture. Therefore replacement of fishmeal to another resource is urgently needed. Several researchers reported the replacement of protein sources from fishmeal to plants. However, the complete replacement by plant proteins are not established   yet because plant sources contained some components that negatively affect the growth of the cultured fish due to the low digestibility. We focused on the “thraustochyrids” as probiotics to enhance the digestibility of plant sources.

Thraustochytrids are widely distributed in marine environment and have unique characteristics that accumulate large amount of lipids in cell bodies. Additionally, it is known that thrastochytrids produce various extracellualr enzymes including refractory components such as cellulose.

In this study, we researched the profile of extracellular enzymes from thraustochytrids and the tolerant ability in the gastrointestinal juices in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the potency as probiotics. Production of various extracellular enzymes, protease, amylase, lipase (tween 80 hydrolytic enzyme), cellulase and tannase were detected depending on the genus or species of thraustochytrids. The tolerance to artificial gastric juices was high in genus Aurantiochytrium and Ulkenia, and low in genus Oblongichytrium. In the case of in vivo test, Aurantiochytrim was recovered from the intestine of Japanese short-necked clam, Ruditapes philippinarum (“Asari” in Japanese). Additionally, we have isolated more than one hundred thraustochytrids from marine environment and are screening probiotic abilities to select adequate strain now. As next step, we are planning the rearing trial with aquaculture-major fish species and supply live thrautochytrids by oral administration

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The present work was to optimize the purification conditions for soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) calipash collagen (STCC) isolated by pepsin and to explore collagen physicochemical properties for potential biomaterial applications. Single-factor test and orthogonal method L9 (34) were employed with the STCC recovery yield as indicator. The optimum purification conditions were obtained when NaCl concentration, collagen concentration and purification time were 2 M, 8 g/L, and 24 h, respectively. Purified STCC were characterized by SDS-PAGE, UV scanning, FTIR, solubility, thermal behavior and amino acid analysis. The results showed that STCC contained high hydroxyproline content than that of other fishery skins, belonging to typical type I collagen in form of [α1(I)] 2α2(I). FTIR spectra of STCC were quite similar to other aquatic animals’ collagens. It has the lowest solubility at pH 6, and when NaCl concentration decreased from 2% to 6% (w/v), solubility dropped. The denaturation temperature (Td) and melting temperature (Tm) were 35.1 °C and 105.14 °C, respectively. Morphology of STCC depicted as regular and porous network structure by SEM. In general, the results suggested that turtle calipash can be exploited as alternatives to mammalian collagen and could also be used for biomedical applications as a potential new material.