Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th Global Summit on Aquaculture & Fisheries Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Shoichiro Ozaki

Professor Emeritus, Ehime University, Japan

Keynote: Promotion of CO2 assimilation by effective use of NOx and NP is best method to produce much fish and protect global warming

Time : 09:00 am to 09:40 am

Aquaculture Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shoichiro Ozaki photo
Biography:

Dr Ozaki has served as the Professor at Ehime University,Department of Chemical Industry and as the Visiting Professor at various reputed universities of the world including University of Konstanz, New York State University and Shangdong University. He had also been a Research Chemist at The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Tokyo, Japan. Currently he is the Professor Emeritus at the Ehime University, Japan. Dr Ozaki has been the recipient of Hatsumeishou (Invention Prize) for the invention of Carmofur (antitumor agent), Gakujutsusho (Academic Prize) from the Japan Chemical Society for the synthesis of biologically active compounds (Carmofur, IP3), Fulbright Award and the Alexander von Fumboldt Award.

Abstract:

The earth is warmed up by the burning of 1.4 billion tone fossil releasing 360 billion tones CO2 in 2016. If we can compensate the generation of CO2 by CO2 assimilation, global warming can is protected. To promote CO2 assimilation, supply of nutrient N and P is essential. About 14.4 billion tone NOx   is produced when fossil is burned .Some country hate NOx as pollution gas and do NOx elimination. Some country does not do NOx elimination and use NOx as fertilizer. NP in drainage is also hated as pollution substance at some country and eliminated.  Use of NOx and NP as fertilizer or eliminate these give great influence on growth of plant, CO2 assimilation, production of grain, fish, electricity price,GDP.  When we look at fish industry of many country, the country which use NOx and N,P in drainage are producing much fish and  fixing much C02. China,Indonesia,India, Vietnam do not eliminate NOx and do not do drainage treatment .  NOx is a promotor of plant growth and CO2 assimilation.  Therefore NOx elimination gives great damage on growth of plant and plankton, production of fish, grain. To eliminate NOx, ammonia is used. By this reaction, precious fertilizer is destroyed by other fertilizer. This is tremendous loss. The country who do this reaction like USA, Japan,Germany ,Italy are consuming much fossil generating much CO2 for elimination of NOx. Therefore electricity price is higher than no NOx elimination country. The country whose electricity price is low can produce well with low price. Then producing industry progress and GDP growth rate become higher.Therefore NOx elimination and drainage NP elimination should be stopped to produce much fish and protect global warming.

Aquaculture Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anilkumar Gopinathan photo
Biography:

Anilkumar Gopinathan, Senior Professor at the Vellore Institute of Technology, India, had  his postdoctoral training (hormone receptor genes) from the University of Oklahoma, USA. Two-time Grantee of the International Foundation for Science (IFS, Sweden), Anilkumar is also the Scientific Advisor to IFS, and contributed significantly to the field of crustacean molecular endocrinology. He had  been Visiting Scientist to University of Gdansk (Poland), Belarus State University and University of Oklahoma (DST-NSF). Recipient of  St. Berchman’s Best Teacher award,  Anilkumar has also chaired scientific sessions in several international conferences and delivered plenary lectures on topics with a bias to aquaculture.

Abstract:

Optimization of aquaculture would require in-depth understanding of metabolism of the candidate species, especially with respect to that of growth and reproduction, the two major high energy – demanding processes.  In fishes, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factors are known to play major role in development and metabolism; studies have allowed discernment of a complex, tissue-specific collection of IGF-I transcripts, through alternative splicing. Recent studies have enabled us to formulate synthetic hormones that could shorten the growth time needed for farm-raised fish to reach market size. Interestingly in crustaceans (crabs, shrimps etc.), regulatory mechanisms rely on the intricate balancing between stimulatory and inhibitory principles. Here, the ecdysteroids, secreted by the Y -  organ, and the terpenoid methyl farnesoate, secreted by the mandibular organ act as stimulatory hormones for growth and reproduction respectively. Further, the neurosecretory cells from the decapod eyestalks are known to produce molecules that could inhibit growth and/or reproduction. Information gathered on the inhibitory hormones from the eyestalk has paved the way for using deeyestalking as a potential tool for induced breeding in female shrimps and lobsters. However, recent observations reveal that in spite of its efficacy in artificially induced egg maturation in female crabs and shrimps for one cycle, deeyestalking is no more considered as a technique of consistency for induced breeding. Results of recent investigations on hormone receptors provide us with valuable clues on viable possibilities for inducing growth and reproduction, and optimization of aquaculture, to be discussed during the proposed talk.

  • Aquafarming | Pisciculture | Aquaculture Nutrition | Aquatic and Marine Pathology | Fish hatchery | Fish stocking | Shrimp farming | Oyster farming | Algaculture | Mariculture | Integrated Multi-Trophic aquaculture | Issues in Aquaculture Netting Materials | Fishing Technology | Aquaculture Innovations and Designs

Session Introduction

Nyan Taw

Shrimp Aquaculture Consultant (Former; Chief Technical Advisor & Consultant for FAO projects of the UN and WB)

Title: A simple technical approach for shrimp farmers for sustainable production using biofloc technology.
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Nyan Taw received his Ph.D. from the University of Tasmania, Australia. He served as short term consultant for FAO and World Bank funded projects in Saudi Arabia and Vietnam. He was a technical counter-part for ADB and JICA projects to develop the fisheries sector in Myanmar from 1976 to 1987. In 1988, he joined the FAO of the UN and served in aquaculture projects in Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines culminating the position of CTA. From 1995, Dr Nyan served as Production Director at a number of locations in Indonesia. In 2002, he joined CP Indonesia, as VP where he initiated biofloc technology. Later he served as SVP for Dipasena Group, Indonesia.

Abstract:

Biofloc technology applied in shrimp farming is in fact adapted from the basic minimum water exchange shrimp intensive culture system used in Indonesia since early late 1990s. The system then was to position aerators within culture ponds to concentrate waste (sludge) into centre of ponds which were then siphon out physically or through central drain system. The aerators were operated almost 24 hours to have optimum culture pond environmental condition. The system creates clean water column and bottom feeding area and separated the sludge area (Taw 2015). The system had been applied in Indonesia in Lampung (Taw, 2005; Taw, et al 2007).

Shrimp biofloc system is somewhat an upgraded system by introducing carbon such as molasses and wheat flour to develop a heterotrophic environment and suspend biofloc colony within pond water column. The biofloc system develop base on what shrimp farmers are used to by developing algae first and later cross over to biofloc to have self-nutrification process sets in  (Taw 2014). Main economic benefits of shrimp biofloc system are – better biosecurity, low FCR, higher production, higher energy efficiency and sustainable production.

The biofloc technology was used in Indonesia without incidents of WSSV where it was a threat to shrimp farmers (Taw, 2005; Taw et al 2008). During late 2000s the IMNV outbreaks in Indonesia caused a huge lost to Indonesian shrimp farmers. During the period a small shrimp farm in Northern Bali using biofloc technology survived by using biofloc technology (Taw & Setio, 2014). In Malaysia biofloc technology has been applied at Blue Archipelago shrimp farm since October 2011 and has been operating successfully without any incident of EMS/AHPND (Taw, et al. 2013 & 2014).

According to In-Kwon (2012 &2014) there were more than 2,000 bacterial species in well-developed biofloc water. A study at Bogor University, Indonesia and Ghent University, Belgium revealed that biofloc system contributes to the enhancement of immune response and survival after IMNV challenge regardless the carbon source. The application of BFT brings about beneficial effect in disease control and management in shrimp culture (Ekasari, et al., 2014). 

Speaker
Biography:

Brett has been working for thirty five years in seafood safety.  After graduating from the University of California at Santa Cruz with a major in Marine Biology in 1980, Brett went directly to work for the State of Texas. He worked for almost ten years there collecting and analyzing aquatic samples measuring environmental contaminant risk.  In 1990 Brett joined the U.S. Food and Drug Administration where has served in a variety of positions including being a Consumer Safety Officer in an FDA field office, the lead National Shellfish Processor Inspector and for 8 years served as the Chief of the Programs and Inspection Branch in FDA’s Office of Seafood where he was an active participant in drafting FDA’s Seafood HACCP implementation policy.

Abstract:

Yes aquaculture is one of the fastest growing sectors of food production but it is dependent on trade. In fact, aquaculture is the primary component of the seafood trade which makes up the largest traded food group in the world.   More than all grains, banana, cocoa, rice, and coffee combined. However, there are serious food safety concerns with aquacultured products that can greatly disrupt this trade and consumer confidence in aquaculture. These concerns include the presence of unsafe residues, pathogens, and the potential to contribute to antimicrobial resistance. When food safety problems are found there are a range of negative impacts. These include significant costs to producers, processors, buyers, importers, and the regulatory agencies, market disruptions, an increase in the negative perception of aquaculture, lost markets, etc.   This talk will describe a new way of approaching aquaculture food safety, minimizing the risk of trade interruptions due to food safety concerns, and an approach to obtaining more customer confidence in aquaculture.

Goh Chee Keong

Senior Manager, Republic Polytechnic, Singapore

Title: Development of Cost-Effective Feeds for Marine Fish Feeding and Growth
Speaker
Biography:

The author obtained his bachelor’s degree with honours in Industrial Chemistry from the University of Putra Malaysia. He later received his Master of Science (Material Chemistry) and PhD at the same university. Currently, he is a Senior Manager at Republic Polytechnic, Singapore and is involved in development, formulation, and characterization of novel encapsulated artificial feeds for marine fish larvae, such as Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer), which is currently funded by the Ministry of Education Translational R&D and Innovation Fund (MOE-TIF).

Abstract:

Presently, Singapore is importing most of the food consumed in the country due to limited farming land and fishing grounds. With Singapore aiming to raise the proportion of locally produced fish from 8% to 15%, it is important to seek the most cost-effective feeds that are able to support good fish growth performance. This is because aquaculture feeds are contributing 50-70% of the total production cost of an aquaculture operation. This paper will discuss a study to use black soldier fly (BSF) larvae as a substitute for fish meal in fish diets, which is a partnership with a local fish farmer. The BSF larvae, which is of animal origin has been reported to show a great potential because it is containing high levels of protein and fats. In term of cost-effectiveness and availability, the BSF larvae grown at high densities on food waste seem to have a good potential for protein (~42%) and lipid (~35%) sources for aquaculture feeds. Through this project, we are using groupers as a model of study for developing BSF larvae as aquaculture feeds. We found that groupers were initially rejected the raw BSF larvae feeds even after multiple attempts of feeding. Thus, we were attempting to make 100% BSF larvae into pellet form using a suitable liquid binder. Finally, the groupers were starting to eat the BSF larvae feeds after processing the BSF larvae into pellets.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor and member of the Department of Environment and Sustainable Development attached to the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Regional Integral Development (CIIDIR), Sinaloa Unit. With the degree of Master of Science in Aquaculture obtained since 1998 with the specialty in culture of bivalve molluscs and Environmental Impact in Aquaculture, has maintained since then the line of research in the development of Indicators of Sustainable Development that has complemented obtaining the degree of Doctor in Sciences in the Use, Management and Preservation of Natural Resources, with specialty in Ecology in March 2004.

Abstract:

Superintensive shrimp farming is characterized by high stocking densities. In these systems, there is zero-water exchange, feed intake and nutrients are controlled; and the accumulation of flocculated particles (bioflocs) formed by aggregates of algae, bacteria, protozoa, faeces, and uneaten feed is favored. Several studies have pointed out that microorganisms present in biofloc systems contribute to stimulate shrimp immune response and growth. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of Bacillus licheniformis BCR 4-3 and molasses on growth performance and gene expression of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) cultured with zero-water exchange. The effects B. licheniformis BCR 4-3 and molasses on growth performance and gene expression in L. vannamei, cultured at high stocking density and zero-water exchange, were evaluated in bioassays with treatments by triplicate. Bioassay 1 (growth): I) Control, biofloc without additives; II) Bioflocs + molasses; III) Bioflocs + bacilli; IV) Bioflocs + bacilli + molasses. Bioassay 2 (gene expression): I) Control, bioflocs without additives; II) Bioflocs + bacilli + molasses. Survival, growth in weight, nitrogenous wastes, total suspended solids (TSS), inorganic (IM) and organic matter (OM), and the expression of crucial immune, digestive, and stress-related genes were determined. Survival was higher and the growth was increased at lower stocking density. Reduction of ammonium concentration was found in treatments with bacilli and bioflocs. TSS and organic matter were either within or above the optimal range for shrimp culture. The expression of superoxide dismutase, lysozyme, HSP90, chymotrypsin, and trypsin genes were down-regulated, whereas mRNA HSP70 transcription was up-regulated in treatments with molasses, bacilli, and bioflocs. Zero-water exchange, B. licheniformis, and molasses promotes biofloc formation that decreases ammonium but stressing culture conditions such as high stocking density, high TSS, and suboptimal temperature and oxygen concentration affect shrimp growth and stress control, digestive, and immune capacity.

Speaker
Biography:

Jorge E. Toro has completed his PhD at the age of 41 years from Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canadá. He is the director of Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Limnológicas at Universidad Austral de Chile. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Given the hybridization ability between species Mytilus edulis platensis and M. galloprovincialis, this research proposed to assess the genetic variability of the hybrid offspring in relation to pure species, using 8 loci microsatellites. The study found differences between hybrid offspring comparing to pure species. The hybrid offspring had the highest observed mean heterozygosity values (Ho = 0,63 ± 0,28) and low values of inbreeding, which tend to significant deviations to negative values of (Fis), demonstrating excess of heterozygote in hybrids comparing with pure species, which displayed significant deviations towards positive values of Fis. The principal component analysis shows three distinct groups among the samples analyzed, identifying the hybrid offspring as an intermediate group between pure species.
Keywords: Mytilus edulis platensis, Mytilus galloprovincialis, hybrids, genetic characterization, micro- satellites.

Lyudmila G. Butorina

Senior Research Scientist, FSBI, I.D.Papanin Institute for Biology of Inland Waters of RAS

Title: On the аquaculture of a plankton crustacean Polyphemus pediculus (Cladocera, Onychopoda)
Speaker
Biography:

In 1972 Lyudmila G. Butorina got a PhD in hydrobiology from Moscow State University (Moscow, Russia). In 1990 she defended a dissertation in zoology and got a Dr. Sci. degree from Moscow State University. Currently she is a senior research scientist at the Laboratory of ecology of aquatic invertebrates of FSBI, I.D.Papanin Institute for Biology of Inland Waters of RAS. L. G. Butorina is the author of more than 150 publications.

Abstract:

Polyphemus pediculus (Linnaeus, 1761) is distributed in the plankton of waters of Northern hemisphere. The crustacean is characterized by a short life cycle, rapid development and reproduction, high degree of aggregation and permanency of its location in the water body. It serves as a main feeding object for young and adult planktivorous fish of the shallows, and predatory invertebrates. The crustacean body contains 22% of fat, 52% of protein, 3% of carbohydrates and 8.1% of ash. P.pediculus is a promising object for a starter feed in industrial fish farming. Extraordinary plasticity of the crustacean phenotype and its individual development, high intensity of its nutrition and frequent defecation, should be considered when establishing the aquaculture. Use of the main component method in the morphometric studies of the species local population, enabled to ascertain existence of age-dependent and sex-related variability of individuals, which occur in correspondence with the biotopic and seasonal conditions. The species local population represents a totality of reliably different morphometric seasonal races, which succeed each other during the open-water season. The aquaculture starting generation should be represented by newborns, which emerged in the vessel, in which the aquaculture is to be maintained. Crustaceans should be kept under stable conditions of 4 to 5 cm3 of water per a specimen, the temperature of 15 to 180 C, the daylight period length of 10 to 12 hours, and permanent presence of green algae and small Cladocera. One third of the aquaculture water should be substituted by a fresh water portion every 7 to 10 days.

Speaker
Biography:

Young-Seok Han has completed his Ph.D. from Incheon National University and postdoctoral studies from Incheon National University. He is the director of NeoEnBiz  Co., the premier organization in the environmental biotechnology, and he has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The cyanobacterium, spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) is used as food supplement because of their nutraceutical ability. The photosynthetic pigment and antioxidant activity of spirulina cultivated indoors and outdoors were compared with USA and Indian spirulina. The contents of chlorophyll a were higher in outdoors > indoors, USA > Indian. The contents of carotenoids pigment were in the order of outdoor> indoor > USA > Indian. Whereas c-phycocyanin pigment contents were higher in indoors > outdoors > USA > Indian. Also, the result of DPPH radical scavenging efficacy and total polyphenol contents were higher in the order of USA, outdoors > India > indoors and outdoors > USA > indoors, India, respectively. As a result, outdoors cultivated spirulina has more photosynthetic pigments than indoor, and antioxidant activity is also better. A noteworthy feature was that USA and Indian spirulina have less content of photosynthetic pigment but more effective antioxidant activity than indoors cultivated spirulina. It may means, the two spirulina were grown at outdoor cultivation. In overall, spirulina grown outdoors has more antioxidant activity than indoors because of the complexity of light intensity and quality. 

Speaker
Biography:

Hannibal M. Chavez has completed his master’s degree at Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan on March 1995 under the Monbusho Scholarship Program. He also finished his Doctorate Degree in Fisheries Technology at Iloilo State College of Fisheries as BFAR scholar. At present, he is the Chief of the Fisheries Production and Support Services Division and Research Manager of BFAR CALABARZON. He has published scientific papers in the refereed journals and his papers published on janitor fish and silver pompano has brought attention in the scientific community and the media not only in the Philippines but in other regions.

Abstract:

The effects of the number of artificial substrates on growth performance, survival and production of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man 1879) were evaluated in cages in Laguna de Bay, Philippines. Juvenile prawns (1.97+0.27 g: 5.52+0.19 cm) were stocked in cages (L x W x D: 2 x 3 x 2 m or 12 m3) at 20 pieces m-3. Three treatments with three replicates each were used: T1 = without substrate; T2 = with 6 pieces artificial substrates and T3 – with 12 pieces artificial substrates. The artificial substrates used in the study consisted of bundled dried tamarind twigs. After 160 days, mean weights were 46.10 g, 45.57 g and 52.20 g in T1, T2 and T3, respectively. The water quality parameters were favourable throughout the experimental period. Production was highly significant among treatments (P<0.01). Highest total production was recorded in T3 (17.90 kg) and T2 (16.40 kg) while T1 has the lowest production (12 kg). Survival was significantly different among treatments (P<0.05). Highest survival was recorded in T3 (85.83%) and T2 (83.05%) and the lowest was observed in T1 (63.19%). Survival and production were greatly influenced by the increased number of substrates. The higher the number of artificial substrates installed, the greater the survival and production of prawns.

Michelle Pretorius

Environmental Officer, Sustainable Aquaculture Management, Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries, South Africa

Title: Water Quality Impacts of Effluent from land-based abalone farms in South Africa
Speaker
Biography:

Michelle Pretorius has completed her MSc at the age of 23 years from the University of Cape Town and is currently pursuing her PhD at the University of the Western Cape. She holds a position as an Environmental Officer in Sustainable Aquaculture Management within the Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries.

Abstract:

Effluent water quality was measured at nine abalone farms in along the South African coastline. Total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations varied markedly as a result of tank cleaning operations (median daytime TSS 10.07 mgl-1 and after-hours 0.56 mgl-1). TSS exceeded the background reference level (80th percentile) for most farms and three did not comply with the 5 mg l-1 standard. The dissolved components show very little difference between working and non-working hours signals for both raw effluent and inflow-corrected effluent (e.g. inflow-corrected NH_4^+ working 3.44 µmol N l-1 and non-working 3.39 µmol N l-1).  NH_4^+concentrations were mostly greater than background reference levels but well below the 43 µmol N l-1 standard. Inflow-corrected concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and phosphate, were low compared to NH_4^+ and would not pose a significant eutrophication risk. Similarly, the biochemical oxygen demand measured at three of the farms was low (median 1.31 mg l-1). At the broader ecosystem level, the annual TSS loads calculated from 2013 production data of 43 mt y-1 (west) and 369 mt y-1 (south) are, respectively, 0.35% and 2.8% of that estimated to be produced by kelp beds through natural erosion of fronds. Similarly, the dissolved inorganic N loads of 1.9 mt N y-1 (west) and 9.4 mt y-1 (south) are trivial by comparison with nitrate advected into the coastal zone during upwelling. Local abalone farms have a relatively high specific C footprint - conservatively about 44 kg CO2 kg-1 production. The present findings support a relatively low potential impact of farm effluents in this coastal upwelling environment.

Maria Marcolina Lima Cardoso

PhD Student, Rio Grande do Norte Federal University

Title: Life-history of Nile Tilapia in Tropical Lakes and Reservoirs
Speaker
Biography:

Maria Cardoso is a young doctor, completing her PhD in Ecology from Rio Grande do Norte Federal University, Brazil, with a PhD stage at University of Amsterdam, Netherlands. She has worked in the areas of lake restoration, exotic species and fishing management with the focus on the optimal use of natural resources. She is expertise in statistics and developing models for fish population dynamics in the tropics. 

Abstract:

Tilapias are one of the major groups of introduced species, representing an important food source and improving the local development. However, changes in the size-structure of tilapia (from dense populations with large adults to overpopulations of stunted individuals) have threatened not only fishing but also appear to be responsible for the negative impacts on native species. In this work, we carried out a review on the attributes of Oreochromis niloticus in tropical lakes and reservoirs, and we model the dynamics of individuals and populations. We found that the maximum size, fecundity and size-at-maturity are positively related to the lake area, however are probably a function of tilapia competition for food/space. The model indicated a low energy required for reproduction making tilapias only ceases reproducing under very unfavorable food conditions. Under low food availability, tilapias reproduce early, producing more eggs per gram of fish. Still, high algae biomass in lakes may induce the stunting of individuals as a consequence of high reproduction of adults tilapias. Such characteristics make tilapia successful in environments with harsh conditions, increasing their abundance and impacts on other species, as well as may not bring the desired economic benefits due to the stunting. The management of tilapia populations is recommended mainly in small and eutrophic lakes, to avoid competition for space and food that reduce tilapia growth rates without altering reproduction. We suggest harvesting on juveniles in parallel with fishing on adults when it is desired to break the stunting state and ensure the sustainability of fishing. 

Tianjiao Zhang

Senior Lecturer, Shanghai Ocean University

Title: Modeling distributions of pelagic fishes based on MaxEnt
Speaker
Biography:

Tianjiao Zhang has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from China Agricultural University. She studied in Oklahoma State University as an exchange student from 2013 to 2015 and was involved in a NOAA project: “Biotic and abiotic factors related to persistence of a federally-threatened cyprinid”. She is now the senior lecturer of Shanghai Ocean University in Shanghai, China. She has published 14 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

There are many fishery resources with high economic and ecological values in the epipelagic and mesopelagic zone of the ocean. Researchers have paid much attention to the relationships between the spatial distribution of pelagic fishes and the marine environment, but few made comparisons among different fishes habitat in oceans all over the world. In this study, we chose 6 species of fishes: Clupea pallasii Valenciennes, Scomber japonicas, Thunnus obesus, Thunnus albacares, Isurus oxyrinchus, and Alopias vulpinus, which used to live in the epipelagic and mesopelagic zone of the ocean, to make comparative analysis on how marine environmental factors influence their spatial distributions. The marine environmental factors included: sea surface temperature (SST), photosynthetic radiation (PAR), chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a), sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface wind speed (MAG). We used the maximum entropy ecological niche model (MaxEnt) to predict the potential distribution of the 6 species of fishes combined with the environmental factors. The accuracy of the model was evaluated with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the results showed that the AUC (area under the ROC curve) values of 6 MaxEnt models were all greater than 0.8, which indicated that the models had high precision. Based on the influence ranking of the marine environment factors, SST, PAR and Chl-a showed the most importance on the potential distribution of all the 6 species of fishes. However, there were large differences among the suitable range of each environmental factor for each fish. The results of this study could provide references for marine fishery.

Speaker
Biography:

Jacqueline Marleen Francischa Sahetapy has completed her MSc at the age of 34 years from Bogor Agricultural University  School of Aquaculture Science. She is currently working as a lecturer at aquaculture study program, Fisheries and Marine Science Faculty Pattimura University Ambon Indonesia. She has published 2 paper in international journal and others in national proceedings and local journal. She has participated in 3 international conference and 2 paper are on the way of publication. Her research interest Recirculating Aquaculture system (RAS), aquaponic and abalone culture in Net Floating Cage.

Abstract:

Clownfish (Amphiprion percula), is a variety of marine ornamental fish. In rearing ornamental fish, water quality management is required to maintain the optimal condition of water quality. Filtration and recirculation are proven as preeminent ways to manage the optimal condition of water quality in aquarium as the vessel for rearing ornamental fish. Simple recirculation system double bottom filter was applied in this research with treatments of components modification of the system. The objective of the research were to identify the concentration of ammonia and survival rate in rearing media of clownfish (A.percula) using recirculation system double bottom filter with several modification components. The treatments are i.e. (1) no recirculation/aeration only (treatment A), (2) system with components of gravel, activated carbon and dacron (treatment B), (3) sand, activated carbon and Dacron (treatment C). The result showed that the ammonia concentration in system A (control) was 8.323 mg/l, system B (gravel, activated carbon and dacron) was 1.599 mg/l, and system C (sand, activated carbon and Dacron) was 0.088 mg/l. The highest value of survival rate was in system C (sand, activated carbon and Dacron) which valued 90%. Water quality  was  monitored twice daily included water temperature (26,3 – 27,4°C),  pH (8,27-8,36), dissolved oxygen (4,95-5,30 mg/L) and water salinity (33,0-34,3 ppt). As the conclusion, component sand, activated carbon and dacron in recirculation system double bottom filter provided better performance in reducing ammonia in rearing media of blue devil (A. percula) which also confirmed with the survival rate value.
Keywords :  Component modification, Double bottom filter, Clownfish (Amphiprion percula) , ammonia

Speaker
Biography:

Alexander Rantetondok has completed his PhD at the age of 54 years from Hasanuddin University and attended Exchanged Scienist sponsor by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science att Faculty of Fisheries, Nagasaki Universityand Tokyo University of Fisheries. He is the former Head of Fish Diseases and Parasites, of Hasanuddin University. He has published more than65 papers in reputed journals International) and  more than 30 papers in National Journals  and has been serving as an editorial board member of some Intrenational and National Journals..Hi is a Professor in Fish Disease and Fish. Immunology at Faculty of Marine Science and Fisheries Hasanuddin University.

Abstract:

This study aims to analysis of performance of the Lactobacillus sp, in the digestive track of the white shrimp after being given various prebiotic in the feed.  Test animals use in this study was white shrimp juvenile, Litopenaeus vannamae measured the weight of 1.84 ± 0.23 g/individu with a stocking density of 10 shrimp/container, cultured for 30 days in a tank measuring of 50 x 45 x 45 cm3 of 12 units use the recirculation systems and filled 50 L seawater with salinity of 15 ppt. The treatments were four types of feed that is formulated with various of prebiotics ie A: (without prebiotic), B:(lotus seeds), C: (sweet potatoes) and D (copra). These four types of treatments have been added Lactobacillus sp.probiotic bacteria with a population density of 1.5 x 109 CFU/ml. The result showed that the effect feeding with various prebiotic on the performance of Lactobacillus bacteria population (1.4 x 104 – 1.2 x 105 CFU/ml) were not significantly difference,  but it was significantly difference to the enzim α-amylase activity, (0.2558 IU/mL/minute), digestibility of carbohydrates (91.89%)  The best resulted is feed added with prebiotic copra, while the fat digestibility (83.93 %) resulted in fedd without prebiotc the showed the lowest resulted
Keywords: Feed, prebiotic, probiotic, white shrimp, Lactobacillus sp 

Speaker
Biography:

AHMADI has completed his M.Sc and PhD from Kagoshima University, Japan in the field of Fundamental Fishing Technology. Formerly he worked for the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, the Republic of Indonesia for 17 years. Among his appointments, he served as Member of the Regional Fisheries Policy Network (RFPN) for Indonesia in 2011 at the SEAFDEC Secretariat in Bangkok, Thailand. Currently he is a lecturer at Faculty of Marine and Fisheries of Lambung Mangkurat University and the Secretary of Fisheries Science Postgraduate Program. He actively writes academic papers and published them in reputed journals. He also serves as editorial team for Journal of Wetlands Environmental Management under the University.

Abstract:

In Japan, the spanner crab or the red frog crab Ranina ranina (Linnaeus, 1758), locally known as “Asahigani”, is an important edible crab for local people in Tanegashima island. We carried out trapping survey to determine the best way of catching for the crab using the baited tangle nets and pots from offshore Tanegashima. The baited tangle nets were made of PA nylon multifilament with five different mesh sizes (37.8mm, 50.5mm, 75.8mm, 97.0mm and 121.2 mm). While the pots were made of PE nylon multifilament with 15mm mesh size. Both traps were attached at 5 m intervals along the line randomly and were lowered onto the seabed for about 5-hr soak time before being taken. A total of 96 crabs R. ranina consisted of 61 males (64%) and 35 females (36%) was caught primarily with the baited tangle nets. The size frequency of males and females was ranged from 67.2 to 138.5mm and from 50.4 to 128.6mm respectively. In term of foraging behavior, males were more abundant in this area. The CPUE for the baited tangle nets was ranged from 2.8 ± 0.58 to 5.4 ± 2.41. The number of the legal-sized crabs ( 93mm) was half time higher than undersized crabs (< 93mm), and most of them were males. The use of a larger mesh size seems to prevent the crabs from further damage and is optimal with respect to clearing-time and escapement of the juvenile crab from the nets. None of R. ranina was found in the pots.

Speaker
Biography:

A dynamic professional with over 34 years of rich indigenous experience in Teaching, Research, and Administration, Dr. Alka Parashar is a Ph.D. (Environmental Impact Assessment), M.Phil (Futurology) faculty of Engineering Science, D.A.V.V. Indore and M.Sc. Zoology (Fishes), Dr. H.S. Gour University Sagar, with expertise in the research fields of Simulation Modeling and Ecological Modeling for planning management and sustainable development, Modeling for environmental system’s assessment (Industrial and Mega-projects) environmental management (Aquatic resources and land use management), Biodiversity conservation, taxonomic identification and rehabilitation of Ichthyo fauna of reverine systems, fish genetic variability and commercialization of indigenous fish species with key focus on top line profitability & optimal utilization of resources in the education and research sectors.

Abstract:

Operanalization of sustainable development would entail search for innovative options that cause minimal environmental media and resource degration, while maximizing socio-economics benefits in terms of environmental planning, policies and system’s management. Computer Simulation modeling is identified as a powerful tool for charting out better options for sustainable development. The paper aims at exploring the utility of qualitative/semiquantative simulation modeling methods in innovative-strategic planning, management and development. The specific methods for modeling of aquapoics/aqualuture dynamics are investigated as cross impact simulation and system dynamics. For the sake of illustration a simulation model has developed for cost benefit and economics of aquaponic/aquaculture system of Tawa Command Area in India. The SD model is designed to develop and integrates the cause & effect relationships of the variables in pond dynamics, related issues to climate, farmers interest, peoples liking, demand, marketing and cost-effectiveness of Aqua/Aquaponic systems. The model has the potentiality to incorporate various policy options to improve Aquaculture/Aquaponic Systems for livelihood generation and sustainable development of the region. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr.A.Chandrasekhara Rao, Asst.Professor, has completed his PhD from Central Institute of Fisheries Education (CIFE), ICAR, Mumbai. He has extensively worked in the marine fisheries research. He has gained experience in teaching, research and extension. He has guided 2 Ph.D. students as minor guide and 6 Post Graduate students as Chairmen of the advisory committee..He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals, one book and editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Ultrastructural changes in the oocytes and hepatocytes in the female Epinephelus diacanthus were studied with the progress of maturation. Transmission Electron microscopic (TEM) observations revealed cytological changes associated with ovarian development. Nucleolus number increased in the Peri Nucleolus stage, which is an indirect indication of increase in protein synthesis with the onset of oogenesis. Zonation of yolk sphere and presence of microvilli in the Zona radiata were observed in mature oocytes. In comparision to the immature phase, mature/ripe stage hepatocytes showed greater development of both endoplasmic reticulum and increased density of mitochondria in the cytoplasm which is an evidence of progress in vitellogenin syntshesis. Yolk protein vitellogenin was partially characterized employing polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Vitellogenin level of expression was increased with the maturation of gonads.

A. Shyla Suganthi

Assistant Professor, Holy Cross College (Autonomous), India

Title: Accessory glands of male brachyuran crabs could assist safe sperm transport
Speaker
Biography:

Shyla Suganthi is currently working as Assistant Professor at Holy Cross College (Autonomous), Nagercoil. In 1997 she received her PhD for her research on the physiology and endocrinology of reproduction in brachyuran decapods from the University of Calicut, Kerala under the supervision of Dr. G. Anilkumar. She has been recognized as Research Guide (for PhD programmes) under the Manonmaniam Sundaranar University since 2008; three research students have been awarded PhD degree and currently she is guiding five students leading to PhD. She has also successfully completed 2 UGC research projects and currently sanctioned with SERB-DST project. She has 26 research publications to her credit in International journals of repute, and has presented/published 39 papers in International and National conferences.

Abstract:

Some brachyuran crabs inhabiting the coastal and intertidal regions, possesses glandular structures called Accessory Glands which are tubular entities, positioned at the posterior part of vas deferens. The morphology and structure of the gland are found to be species specific. In Parasesarma plicatum, the posterior vas deferens (PVD) is fringed with small pouch-like accessory glands. In other species such as Sarmatium punctatum., and Ocypode sp. the accessory glands appear as bunches of tubules placed at the distal PVD. Interestingly, in the crab Metopograpsus messor, there are seven long fasciculate tubules; in Grapsus sp., the Accessory Glands are seen as abundant number of tubes. Light microscopically and ultra-structurally, the glandular architecture and their mode of secretion appear diverse in different species. Principally, the secretory products of the accessory glands are protein and carbohydrate. Although the exact role of the accessory gland secretion in brachyuran crabs is still unclear, there are evidences to suggest that they may provide mechanical support for the safe transport of spermatophores in to the spermatheca of the female reproductive system during mating and thereby facilitates the gradual splintering of spermatophores to release free sperm. The accessory gland secretion is also suggested to assist long term sperm storage in brachyuran crabs.

Rani Palaniswamy

Principal Scientist, Central Inland Fisheries Research Institute, ICAR, India

Title: Culture based reservoirs fishery management in tropical regions, India - A case study
Speaker
Biography:

Completed 31 yrs of service as Scientist in Indian Council of Agricultural Research. Currently Principal scientist in Central Inland Fisheries Research Institute under ICAR and published more than 40 papers on fisheries, limnology and culture based fisheries system of freshwater reservoirs. 

Abstract:

Culture based fisheries (CBF) practices in Indian reservoirs play an important role to fulfill the pressure of growing demand of fish. Around 69 manmade reservoirs of Tamilnadu state, India are intensively utilised for fish production through CBF. Catla catla conspicuously outperformed in growth to other Indian major carps Cirrhinus mrigala and Labeo rohita stocked along with this fish. Time series data on annual stock rate (nos/ha) and fish catch (kg/ha) of Catla catla for 28 years on 22 reservoirs of different Carlson‘s TSI values were collected from state fisheries authorities. Reservoirs were grouped into three categories, Western ghat oligotrophic small reservoir (WGOSR), Western ghat oligotrophic medium reservoirs (WGOMR) and mesotrophic plainland reservoirs (MPR). Trend behavior of stocking density with catch over time was analyzed through nonparametric statistical analysis such as Mann-Kendall Test, Sen's slope and Kendall correlation using R/SAS software. Results showed that insignificant (p>0.05) monotonic upward trend in stocking density resulting significant (p<0.05) monotonic upward trend in catch in WGOSR indicated the annual fish catch rate (kg/ha) inclined gradually inspite of inconsistent increase in seed stocking rate (r=0.49. p=0.002). Conversely in WGOMR, catch was inconsistent with respect to the stocking rate as depicted in insignificant trend values (r=0.02. p=0.84). In MPR, the trends ascending rate of stocking enhanced correspondingly the production (r=0.27. p=0.03)   giving scope for further stocking would facilitate the utilization of biogenic capacity of the mesotrophic reservoirs. Hence, production functions of the reservoirs are determined by the trophic status than the surface area.
Key words: Culture based fishery, reservoir, time series, trend analysis, fishery management

Ritu Prem

PhD Student, Indian Insititute of Technology, Kharagpur, India

Title: Design and development of a novel fish feeding system for small and marginal farmers
Speaker
Biography:

Ritu has completed her B.Tech in Agricultural Engineering at the age of 22 years from Kerala Agricultural University and M.Tech in Aquacultural Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur. She is currently doing her Ph.D in Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur. She has published a journal paper and presented her work in International Conference on Water- Pollution to Purification 2015.

Abstract:

Intensification of aquaculture practices in order to increase the production at par with the increasing demand has led to higher use of supplementary feeds. Feed costs has a significant share of 60-70% of the total production costs, so feed must be judicially applied without any wastage. Both overfeeding and underfeeding are not preferred; overfeeding leads to feed wastage while underfeeding affects the production. So feeding devices which will effectively dispense the feed in the ponds are of great importance. Demand type feeders have been found better than automatic feeders when feed wastage is considered but the automatic feeders help in dispensing fixed amount of feed at preset timings. Since most of the farmers in underdeveloped and developing countries can’t afford systems using high-end technology, simple innovations are necessary to meet the needs of small and marginal farmers. This study aims to develop a novel feeding system which will simply mechanize the current method of feeding practiced by the farmers and optimize the amount of feed dispensed, thus reducing the feed wastage. The designed feeder is mobile so it can feed aquaculture ponds of any size.  The prototype of the proposed design is under construction and will be rigorously tested in laboratory and field conditions.

Nishita Lal

PhD Student, Vellore Insititute of Technology, India

Title: Studies on the Moulting and Developmental Stages of the Brine Shrimp (Artemia)
Speaker
Biography:

Nishita Lal is pursuing her PhD in the field of crustacean molecular endocrinology from Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, TN, India, under the guidance of Dr. Anilkumar Gopinathan (Sr. Prof). She has published a review paper entitled “Nuclear Receptors, A Paradigm of Importance for Understanding Hormone Action in Invertebrates: An Overview on Crustaceans” and recently presented paper entitled “Ecdysteroid binding with the nuclear receptor (EcR) in Indian field crabs: First Time Report” is in the 7th National Seminar on Bioinformatics is yet be communicate for publication.

Abstract:

Artemia, the brine shrimp, is widely known as the live feed for finfish and shellfish aquaculture. A clear understanding of the moult, reproductive and developmental stages of a species in question is essential for maintenance of a sustainable stock of the brine shrimp which in turn is crucial for optimization of aquaculture. The present paper would address  the precise characterization of moulting, reproductive and developmental stages of Artemia sp. maintained under laboratory conditions. This study illustrates the stage dependent setogenic events of the telopodite which would provide us with an accurate and simple method for characterization of moult stages. The present study also focuses on the developmental stages of Artemia which would help us precisely identify the larval stages and the ‘age’ of the larvae, a basic, but key information for sustainable maintenance of its culture. The study also brings out a comparative account on the morphological features of the larval, pre-adult and adult stages of Artemia, which would be helpful in identification of the species. The study has also focused on the changes of pre-spawned and post-spawned eggs in laboratory – reared Artemia stock.

M. Nazrul Islam

Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

Title: Economic Returns of Existing Various Shrimp Farming Practice in Southwest Region of Bangladesh
Biography:

Dr M. Nazrul Islam is the professor of the Department of Zoology at the University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

Abstract:

Shrimp is one of the leading exportable seafood products from where Bangladesh is earning about UD$ 500 million yearly contributing 3.78% to the GDP. Shrimp farmers follow the traditional and extensive farming practices and the average production is 275 kg/ha which is the lowest compared to other shrimp producing countries around the world this production rate is the lowest. Reasons of this low production are lack of better technology, dearth of quality seed and feed, and effect of shrimp disease. Small-scale organic shrimp farming practice introduced recently, has shown better production and profitability in four coastal sub districts (Upazila) of Sathkira district in the southwest part of the country. Three different farming practices were studied: (i) organic (ii) traditional and (iii) extensive or control farming. Farmers who are used to practice these farming systems were interviewed to collect different data. The data show that organic farmers are producing average 451 kg/ha which is 10.64% higher than the traditional, and 20.84% higher than extensive or control farming systems. Cost benefit analysis showed that organic farming is more profitable compared to other practices because of low input cost and premium price received for organic shrimp. Percentage of gross sale of organic cultured shrimp is 10% higher than traditional and 19.37% higher than control or extensive shrimp farming.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Rahim Peyghan has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from Tehran University-Iran  and 6 months postdoctoral studies from Aquaculture school, Lanceston, Tasmania. He is the professor of Shahid Chamran University. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been authored and published 8 books. 

Abstract:

This study deals with the details of cloning, expression of recombinant ompTS of Aeromonas hydrophila and studied the immunogenicity of this protein in common carp. Escherichia coli strains DH5α and BL21 (Pasture institute, Iran) were used for cloning and expression of ompTS. For vaccination and challenge study, 270 fish were maintained under laboratory conditions. Blood sample was taken from fish of each group and assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assey (ELISA). The LD50 data revealed that LD50 value of Aeromonas hydrophila in this study was about 108.5cfu. We isolated A. hydrophila in kidney tissue of fish, indicating that the death was directly related to A. hydrophila. Significantly higher mortalities occurred in control groups (PBS, PBS+adjuvant) (76.66%, 56.66%) compared with fish vaccinated with recombinant OmpTS protein purified with NI-NTA column with(13.33%) and without adjuant (16.66%), and electroeluted method respectively (13.33%) and (23.33%), with and without adjuvantrespectively (P˂0.05) (Figure 10 and 11). There was no significant differences between fish mortalities vaccinated with recombinant protein in both method of purification, with and without adjuvant (P≥0.05). The RPS value of fish vaccinated with NI-NTA OmpTS, NI-NTA OmpTS plus adjuvant, OmpTSelectroeluted and OmpTSelectroeluted plus adjuvant were 78.26%, 82.61%, 69.57 and 78.26% respectively. There was a significant differences between the RPS of fish vaccinated with recombinant protein in both method of purification, with and without adjuvant and control group (P˂0.05).