Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th Global Summit on Aquaculture & Fisheries Osaka, Japan.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Nyan Taw

Shrimp Aquaculture Consultant (Former; Chief Technical Advisor & Consultant for FAO projects of the UN and WB)

Keynote: Various intensive shrimp farming systems in Asia: Commercial implementation of biofloc and RAS production systems help control shrimp farming diseases

Time : 09:00 am to 09:40 am

Aquaculture Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nyan Taw photo
Biography:

Dr Nyan Taw received his Ph.D. from the University of Tasmania, Australia. He served as short term consultant for FAO and World Bank funded projects in Saudi Arabia and Vietnam. He was a technical counter-part for ADB and JICA projects to develop the fisheries sector in Myanmar from 1976 to 1987. In 1988, he joined the FAO of the UN and served in aquaculture projects in Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines culminating the position of CTA. From 1995, Dr Nyan served as Production Director at a number of locations in Indonesia. In 2002, he joined CP Indonesia, as VP where he initiated biofloc technology. Later he served as SVP for Dipasena Group, Indonesia.

Abstract:

Before the mid-1990s, the major diseases affecting the farmed shrimp industry were of bacterial origin. But in Asia and from late 1994, the appearance of various, major viral diseases ­– like White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV), Yellow Head Virus (YHV), Infectious Myonecrosis Virus (IMNV) and others – led to changes in the design and operation of some shrimp farms to help prevent outbreaks and dissemination of viral diseases. More recently, WSSV outbreaks in Saudi Arabia in farming operations for Indian white shrimp (Penaeus indicus) provided more evidence that additional biosecurity was needed. And since 2009, outbreaks of a new bacterial disease, Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Syndrome (AHPNS) – which started in China and spread to Asia and later Central America in 2015 – has caused losses of billions of dollars. In Australia WSSV outbreak in early 2017 at black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) farms provide additional evidence for the need to change shrimp production systems.

Because of old and newly emerging viral and bacterial diseases affecting their farmed shrimp industry, some years ago various Asian countries started developing and using biofloc and recirculation aquaculture system (RAS) production technologies and/or treating incoming water for culture operations and wastewater treatment as biosecurity measures for disease prevention and control. Many production systems are used by Asian shrimp growers – from single-pond base management to larger RAS systems – but many have yet to reduce their environmental impact due to their wastewater discharges.

Examples of different biofloc and recirculation aquaculture (RAS) shrimp farming systems used in Asia in the last two decades, including some of the projects I have personally been involved with and provided technical expertise, as well as some perspectives on these technologies are provided.  Large integrated shrimp farms in Indonesia: Dipasena group in Lampung, PT CPB in Lampung and PT SAJ in Sumbawa and Blue Archipelago Bhd projects in Kedah and Terengganu in Malaysia.

In any aquaculture business, sustainability of a system can improve profits. With emerging disease problems, treating wastewater discharged from farming facility or RAS is of utmost important. What investors, shrimp farmers and technicians need to be aware of is that, whatever waste is discharged into the environment, it will likely com/e back to you in the form of disease sooner or later.

  • Recirculating Aquaculture Systems | Aquaponics | Aquaculture Resource Management | Aquaculture engineering | Aquatic Physiology | Aquatic plant farming | Marine and Aquatic biology | Socioeconomics of Fisheries and Aquaculture | Sustainability in Aquaculture Practice | Captive Fishing | Aquaculture laws and regulations | Fisheries Ecology and Management | Biotechnology and Genetics in Aquaculture and Fisheries
Speaker
Biography:

Tae Seob Choi has completed his PhD from Chonnam National University in Gwangju, KOREA and postdoctoral studies from Department of Environmental Science, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is the director of environmental business in NeoEnBiz Co. Ltd. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and numerous presentations at relevant conferences. He has been also serving as a board member of  relevant National R&D Committee.

Abstract:

The effect of powder mixed feed adding marine microalga, Arthrospria platensis was conducted to investigate the survival, growth and physiological response of whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The purpose of this study is to develop a natural source of food replacing antibiotics in feed. The addition amount of spirulina was set at treatment groups (low ; 0.1%, high ; 1.0%) and control (0.0%) in this experiment. After feeding during six weeks, the effect of spirulina as a feed additives was analyzed as growth, survival, feed efficiency, nonspecific immunity and resistant disease on whiteleg shrimp. There were significantly showed the difference between treatment groups (low and high) and control on growth, survival and feed efficiency. The results of blood analysis indicated the glucose contents higher in low treatment (0.1 %) than in other groups. In addition, the content of triglyceride was showed more in treatment groups (low and high) than in control group. As a result of nonspecific immunological index analysis, antiprotease inhibition was also significantly higher in the spirulina supplemented groups than in the control group. However, the results on lysozyme, PO, SOD, and resistant disease did not reveal a trend or significant difference between all treatment and control groups. The results of this study suggest that spirulina as a feed additives may increase the growth, feed efficiency and the nonspecific immunity when added to the whiteleg L. vannamei mixed diet. And the optimal amount of spirulina was estimated to be around 0.1 %.

Speaker
Biography:

A dynamic professional with over 34 years of rich indigenous experience in Teaching, Research, and Administration, Dr. Alka Parashar is a Ph.D. (Environmental Impact Assessment), M.Phil (Futurology) faculty of Engineering Science, D.A.V.V. Indore and M.Sc. Zoology (Fishes), Dr. H.S. Gour University Sagar, with expertise in the research fields of Simulation Modeling and Ecological Modeling for planning management and sustainable development, Modeling for environmental system’s assessment (Industrial and Mega-projects) environmental management (Aquatic resources and land use management), Biodiversity conservation, taxonomic identification and rehabilitation of Ichthyo fauna of reverine systems, fish genetic variability and commercialization of indigenous fish species with key focus on top line profitability & optimal utilization of resources in the education and research sectors.

Abstract:

Aquaculture is playing important role in the production of quality protein for mankind. Indian ornamental fishes on the other hand support major trade both in domestic and international market. Small indigenous species of fish play a vital role in providing nutrition to the rural poor livelihood and food security. Feed is influencing the growth, survival, pigmentation and maturation in fishes. In views of poverty allevation and employment generation as well as to explore the importance of indigenous fishes and for commercial purpose, an attempt has been made to develop formulated feed from cheap ,locally available carotenoid materials (Spirulina and Carrot) useful in formulating healthy feeds that can provide quick growth, maturation and coloration in fishes . Therefore the experiments are carried out with three replicates of the indigenous fish- Puntius sophore for the periods of four months. The standard culture method have been adopted and physico-chemical factors of water also have provided at optimal conditions, for each group. Experimental diets containing 4 %, 6%, 8% and 10% Spirulina and Carrot powder added diets along with a carotenoid free basic carp feed is utilized as a control diet. In all fish genera feeding with Spirulina showed a significant higher fecundity and growth as compared to control and carrot  diet (p<0.01).The mean GSI value in Male and Female were 1.02 % and 11.23 % recorded in the fishes fed on the control diet as compare to this feed 10 % Spirulina (SP) added feeds has recorded maximum Gonado Somatic Index (GSI) value 1.23 % and 12.52 % in Male and Female. By the estimation of fecundity the highest number of eggs (1401) has recorded in the fishes fed on the diet with 10 % SP diet ,while the lowest (989) has recorded in the fishes fed on the  control diet but 8 % carrot powder added diet shows  the highest total carotenoid contents 5.98 mg/kg  in male and 5.49mg/kg in female fishes. Thus results indicate  that carotenoid added formulated diets in fishes can provide desired pigmentation and growth performances and improve their potentials to put forward them as ornamentally sustainable value for commercial trade.

Abdeen Omer

Associate Researcher, Energy Research Institute, UK

Title: Natural Renewable Water Resources and Ecosystems
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Energy Research Institute (ERI). He obtained both his PhD degree in the Built Environment and Master of Philosophy degree in Renewable Energy Technologies from the University of Nottingham. He is qualified Mechanical Engineer with a proven track record within the water industry and renewable energy technologies. He has been graduated from University of El Menoufia, Egypt, BSc in Mechanical Engineering. His previous experience involved being a member of the research team at the National Council for Research/Energy Research Institute in Sudan and working director of research and development for National Water Equipment Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 7 books and 150 chapters in books.

Abstract:

A booming economy, high population, land-locked location, vast area, remote separated and poorly accessible rural areas, large reserves of oil, excellent sunshine, large mining sector and cattle farming on a large scale, are factors which are most influential to the total water scene in Sudan. It is expected that the pace of implementation of water infrastructure will increase and the quality of work will improve in addition to building the capacity of the private and district staff in contracting procedures. The financial accountability is also easier and more transparent. The communities should be fully utilised in any attempts to promote the local management of water supply and sanitation systems. There is little notion of ‘service, invoice and move on’. As a result, there are major problems looming with sustainability of completed projects. A charge in water and sanitation sector approaches from supply-driven approach to demand-responsive approach call for full community participation. The community should be defined in terms of their primary role as user/clients. Private-sector services are necessary because there are gaps, which exist as a result of the Government not being able to provide water services due to limited financial resources and increase in population. The factors affecting the eco-environmental changes are complex, interrelated, and interactive. The deterioration problems of water and sanitation have attracted some attention in recent years. There is an urgent need to study possible rehabilitation measures to ensure a sustainable and excellent water quality and improved sanitation.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Sevgi Savas has completed  PhD at the age of 30 years from Egean University. She is working as lecturer  at Süleyman Demirel University since 1994 . She is also dean Fisheries Faculty of SDU since 2015.

Abstract:

In this study, L-type marine rotifer Brachionus plicatilis were enriched with 10 levels (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, 500, 1000 and 1500 mg L-carnitine per l) of L-carnitine supplements dissolved in marine Chlorella spp. culture medium in  1 L mass culture trial for 7 days. The initial rotifer density was 100 ind ml-1 . The trials were conducted 1.5 x 106 cell ml-1 at food density, at 25±1ºC under an axenic condition in the laboratory. L-Carnitine enrichment has shown considerable influence on the population growth, reproduction and individual growth of rotifer Brachionus plicatilis The increase of population density was detected in 0.1-100 mg l-1 L-carnitine-treated rotifers but the highest population density (P<0.05) was detected 704,50±5,50 ind ml-1. L-carnitine significantly stimulated reproduction of enriched rotifers. The results suggest that L-carnitine could be a positive factor to enhance reproduction and population growth on enriched Brachionus plicatilis.

Shoichiro Ozaki

Professor Emeritus, Ehime University, Japan

Title: Method to fit Paris agreement for protection of global warming
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Ozaki has served as the Professor at Ehime University,Department of Chemical Industry and as the Visiting Professor at various reputed universities of the world including University of Konstanz, New York State University and Shangdong University. He had also been a Research Chemist at The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Tokyo, Japan. Currently he is the Professor Emeritus at the Ehime University, Japan. Dr Ozaki has been the recipient of Hatsumeishou (Invention Prize) for the invention of Carmofur (antitumor agent), Gakujutsusho (Academic Prize) from the Japan Chemical Society for the synthesis of biologically active compounds (Carmofur, IP3), Fulbright Award and the Alexander von Fumboldt Award.

Abstract:

Fossil fuel burn released 360 billion tones CO2 in 2016. Burning reaction is reverse reaction of CO2 assimilation. If we can compensate the generation of CO2 and heart of burning with the absorption of CO2 and heart by CO2 assimilation, global warming will be protected. But burning is predominant and 142 billion tone CO2 is increasing each year. To promote CO2 assimilation, supply of nutrient N and P is essential. 14.4 billion Tones NOx is produced when fossil fuel is burned. Many governments are eliminating NOx as pollution gas. Large amount of N and P in drainage is eliminated as pollution substance using much electricity. If we stop elimination of NOx and NP in drainage, 10 billion tone CO2 emission and 5 million tone fossil consumption will be saved and 142 billion tone CO2 can be fixed to protect global warming.  NOx in exhaust gas and N, P in drainage should be released as it is.  Promotion of plankton CO2 assimilation must be accomplished by increasing NP concentration of sea.  Elimination of law which forced to eliminate nutrient N, P and study on agitation of sea water are important subjects for the protection of global warming. Since industrial revolution, mankind is using large amount of fossil fuel. Remaining estimated amount of buried fossil fuel:  oil is 1730 billion tones, 42 years, natural gas is 2760 billion tones, 60 years, and coal is 9090 billion tones, 132 years. We should not waste precious fossil fuel for the elimination of NOx , NP. We should promote CO2 assimilation to make carbohydrate for food and for energy sources.

Speaker
Biography:

Henry is 24 years of age from Zambia. He is a graduate of the Copperbelt University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Fisheries and Aquaculture. He also has additional certificates in Business and Entrepreneurial Development from the University of South Africa-School of Business Leadership and Instructional Pedagogy from the University of Zambia-School of Education. He is currently working as a Lecturer and researcher at Zambia College of Agriculture (ZCA-Mpika). Henry is an ambitious young man whose inspiration is from the parents that taught him to face life with courage and always live up to his dreams. He is passionate about the youths and their welfare, I believe that, if every youth lived up to their dreams and become innovative and face life head on, the world would house a generation of great entrepreneurs and the issue of unemployment would be a thing of the past. His plan is to build a Farm Institute that will concentrate on research and equipping youths and women with aquaculture and agriculture skills.

Abstract:

A study on nutritional value and consumer acceptability of sundried, smoke dried and fresh tilapia species was undertaken in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia. The study involved undertaking a survey at three major markets, namely; Chisokone (in Kitwe), Roan (in Luanshya), and Main Masala (in Ndola) to ascertain; prevailing prices of fish, consumer preferences and acceptability. In addition, proximate chemical analysis was conducted on sundried, smoke dried and fresh tilapia species in the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of the Copperbelt University, in order to determine some nutrient composition. Results of the survey indicated that fresh fish was by far the cheapest (53%) and most preferable by consumers (68%) compared to sundried and smoke dried. At the same time, smoke dried fish was perceived to be the most expensive on the market. Similarly, proximate chemical analysis results indicated that smoke dried fish had the highest crude protein content (69.4%), while fresh fish had the least (57.4%) content. Meanwhile, fresh fish showed that it had the highest level of ash (17.6%), while sundried had the least (5.5%). However, ether extract was much higher in smoke dried fish (24.6%) compared with the other two types. The highest amount of moisture content was recorded in fresh fish (67.9%) and the least was recorded in smoke dried (7.37%) fish. Based on this study, it was established that there were several factors underlying the acceptance of sundried, smoke dried and fresh tilapia fish species on the market. Some of the factors included: health reasons, preference, taste, diversity of preparation methods and family satisfaction, quality of the fish being sold and place where trading was taking place. The consumers on the other hand based their acceptance to purchase the commodity on factors to do with their individual satisfaction of some of the aforementioned prevailing conditions. Nutritional value and consumer acceptance of tilapia species was largely dependent on processing method used, that were seen to affect both the nutrient composition as well as the consumer preference in buying the commodity. Furthermore, many consumers attributed their inability to purchase much more of sundried and smoke dried fish to higher prices being charged by traders.

Charles Teta

Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries, Rhodes University, South Africa

Title: Menthol as an alternative anaesthetic and sedative for trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss
Speaker
Biography:

Charles Teta completed his PhD in Environnmental Toxicology and his BSc. (Hons) in Applied Biology and Biochemistry at National University of Science and Technology. Current, he is a Post Doctoral Research Fellow at Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries,  Rhodes University, South Africa. He has published 5 papers in reputed journals and hes is serving as a council member of Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Africa.

Abstract:

Fish have a neuroendocrine system that is highly sensitive to nociceptive stimuli and stressful conditions. As a result, ethical considerations necessitate the use of anaesthetic agents to ameliorate suffering. Menthol is well-known for its analgesic properties, but little information is available on its potential as an anaesthetic on fish. The purpose of this study was to assess anaesthetic effectiveness of menthol and its safety on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile trout (180 g ± 28) were exposed to concentrations of 10–150 mg/l menthol in water and observed for physiological responses, induction time and recovery times. Menthol concentrations of 40-150 mg/l induced anaesthesia, albeit after varying exposure times. There was an exponential relationship (p<0.001) between induction time and menthol concentration. Menthol concentrations of 80–150 mg/l induced anaesthesia within 3 minutes of exposure and fish recovered within 5 minutes. Induction and recovery data showed that 80 mg/l was most suitable for anaesthesia. Concentrations of 10–20 mg/l had sedative effects. Menthol stock solutions prepared using ethanol and acetone and storage of stock solutions at room temperature up to 48 hrs had no significant differences in anaesthetic response. When exposure duration was kept constant at 3 mins, 22% of fish had temporary cessation of gill ventilation and such fish had longer recovery times. No observable health effects were noted within 72 hrs post-exposure. The results show that menthol is an effective anaesthetic for trout. However more studies on biochemical responses of exposed fish are recommended.

Biography:

Imani Kapinga is a 35 years old female (Mrs), a PhD student at Dar es salaam University, Tanzania. She is a research officer at Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI). She has published one paper in an international journal and one submitted for peer review.

Abstract:

Farming of mixed sex of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus is challenged by prolific breeding which leads to slow growth due to competition for food, space and oxygen. Synthetic hormones have been used to produce all-males stock which are favored than females due to their ability to grow fast. However, hormones are expensive and inaccessible for most small scale farmers. Therefore, this study investigated two medicinal plants Aspilia mossambicensis and Azadirachta indica potential to control reproductive performance and sex ratio of O. niloticus. To assess reproductive performance, juveniles (41.5 ± 3.1g mean weight) were fed experimental diets contained 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 8.0 g of A. indica or A. mossambicensis leaf powder per kg of control diet (25% CP) at a ratio of 3% body weight for 90 days. For sex reversal experiment, two weeks old hatchlings were fed diets contained 40 grams of A. indica or A. mossambicensis powder per kg of control diet for 60 days and then followed by control feed for the remaining 90 days at 20% of their body weight. Feeding was done two times a day (10.00 and 17.00 hours). Results revealed that A. indica and A. mossambicensis significantly decreased reproductive performance of fish (p < 0.05). Accordingly, the two plants significantly altered sex ratio (SER) in favor of males (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that A. indica and A. mossambicensis can control prolific breeding as well as alter sex ratio of O. niloticus.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ogundiran, Mathew Akinloye has completed his PhD at the age of 40 years from Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria. His area of specialization is Zoology and has a major in Fisheries and Hydrobiology. He has published more than 16 papers in reputed journals including omics journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputable Journals across the globe.

Abstract:

Despite the existence of environmental legislations in Nigeria, aquatic environment has remained the sewer for wastes not minding its implications on the resident resources. Heavy metals pollution has become a worldwide concern and this may be due to their ability to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms which is a source of livelihood for human populations. Therefore, this work aimed at assessing heavy metal accumulation in Clarias buthupogon and Heterobranchus longifilis in Asa River, Nigeria. After reconnaissance survey, fish samples were collected using hooks, traps and cast nets of various sizes twice monthly between April, 2011 and March, 2013 and were identified immediately. The samples were processed and heavy metal concentrations were determined in the gill, liver and muscle using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Different metals were analyzed in the gill, liver and muscle of the sampled fish species and the data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using the T-test statistical package to determine the level of difference between means. The results in (mg kg-1, dry weight) showed different levels of the analyzed metals in the two fish species. The order of heavy metals accumulation in the two fish species are gills>liver>muscle and the levels of heavy metals bioaccumulation varied significantly (p<0.05) among season, sample locations, fish species and fish organs. All metals analyzed vary significantly in the two fish species examined, seasons and across sampling sites. The results suggest that Asa River has high pollution loads of these heavy metals in fishes due to an indiscriminate of discharge of effluents in the river and could pose a health hazards to man. Consequently, close monitoring of heavy metal loads in Asa River is recommended with a view of minimizing the risks to health of the population that depend on the river for their water and fish supply.

Edward Terhemen Akange

Lecturer, Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, University Agriculture Makurdi

Title: Impact of Wurukum Abattoir Effluent on River Benue Nigeria, Using Macroinvertebrates as Bioindicators
Speaker
Biography:

Edward Akange is a Lecturer at the Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, University Agriculture Makurdi, Nigeria. He holds a Master of Science Degree in Hydrobiology and Fisheries and is currently on his Doctoral Degree in Fisheries Management. He is a member of reputable professional organisation and has 10 scholarly publications to his credit.

Abstract:

The pollution status of Wurukum Abattoir was assessed using macroinvertebrates as bioindicators for a period of four months (November, 2015 - February, 2016). Abundance-Biomass comparison was used to evaluate the number (abundance) and weight (biomass) of macroinvetebrates so as to determine their tolerance or otherwise to the abattoir effluent. Four stations were selected along the River Benue with station B as the point of discharge. Water samples and bottom sediments were collected for the measurement of water physico-chemistry and macroinvertebrates. An assessment of the macroinvertebrates showed the percentage abundance of pollution-tolerant species such as Chiromonus larvae (3.4%) , Eristalis tennax (17.93), Tubifex tubifex(52.45%) and Macrobdella  decora (3.54%) in stations B was attributable to the effect of the abattoir waste discharged into River Benue. The ABC curve also indicated showed the abundance curve laying above the biomass curve at station B. The water quality parameters recorded higher concentrations at station B than other stations for EC (496.50±6.38 µs/cm); TDS (247.70±3.17 Mg/L); BOD (0.91±0.08 Mg/L) while DO (4.23±0.06 Mg/l) was lower at the point of discharge (station B). It was concluded from these results that the abattoir effluents had an impact on the water quality and macroinvertebrates composition, abundance and biomass at the assessed stations. The abattoir effluent could be effectively recycled into arable crop usage due to the high nutrient value.

Zacharia Shitote

Lecturer, Project planning and Management, School of Business and Management Sciences, University of Eldoret

Title: Socioeconomics of Fisheries and Aquaculture: the Price Paradox in Kenya’s Fisheries Sector.
Speaker
Biography:

Zacharia Shitote is a lecturer of Project planning and Management in the School of Business and Management Sciences at University of Eldoret in Kenya. He holds a PhD in Disaster and Sustainable Development, and Certificate in Intensive Aquaculture Production from MATC Israel. He is the proprietor of AquaFarm International which besides Aquaculture consultancy services specializes in Tilapia and Catfish grow out production. He has published widely on Aquaculture in reputed international journals and speaker in several conferences.

Abstract:

Fisheries and aquaculture sector contributes to Kenya’s Gross National product (about 5%) through export earnings, employment, food security and livelihoods. The sector cannot be under-estimated in accelerating economic growth; poverty alleviation, employment generation and increased self-reliance. The paradox in fish farming is that there is no standard pricing for most fish products, as the case of beef and pork. Fish is sold in tins, pieces or in kilograms depending on the species. Cost of fingerlings varies from hatchery to hatchery, because there is no policy on fish pricing. These leads to economic and post-harvest losses as fish farmers struggle to sell their products. Poverty has been a persistent problem in fishing communities because there has been free and open access to inland water bodies and fishing is a last resort occupation for most youth and women. Excessive fishing and encroachment by water hyacinth especially on Lake Victoria has caused lower catches, affecting income of fishermen.These factors inhibit sustained development of artisanal fisheries and rural fish farmers.To mitigate these, the Government has been implementing since 2009 the Economic stimulus program, in adopting a more rational approach to management and development of fish farming. However, most of its gains have largely failed to affect the resource-poor small scale fishermen who represent the majority among the fishing community.Socioeconomic constraints arise from low education, economic status and low incomes from fish farming due to unpredictable prices.The socioeconomic factors affecting aquaculture development in Kenya are complex and exert increasing pressures on sustainable aquaculture development.

Speaker
Biography:

The author obtained his Bachelor’s degree with honours in Industrial Chemistry from the University of Putra Malaysia. He later received his Master of Science (Material Chemistry) and Ph.D. at the same university. Currently, he is a Senior Manager at Republic Polytechnic, Singapore and is involved in development, formulation, and characterization of novel encapsulated artificial feeds for marine fish larvae, such as Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer), which is currently funded by the Ministry of Education Translational R&D and Innovation Fund (MOE-TIF).

Abstract:

In this paper, an attempt was made for encapsulation of chitosan loaded with egg yolks as protein source through layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique and followed by its in-vitro digestibility study, which is suitable for use in the early feeding of fish larvae. The chitosan-based microcapsules were designed to produce microcapsules with a suitable size-range for easy recognition and ingestion by marine fish larvae (50-100 μm), sufficient stability in terms of protein leakage and appropriate digestibility by the simulated-enzymes of marine fish larvae guts. Desired particle-size and stability against protein leakages over 8 hours were successfully achieved by optimizing the encapsulation process conditions. The digestibility trend of the chitosan microcapsules loaded with egg yolks was found similar to that measured for Artemia nauplii, which is commonly live feeds used for the feeding of fish larvae. Thus, the outcome of the in-vitro evaluation showed a promising characteristic as artificial larval feed with respect to entrap nutrients for further development to partially or fully replace live feeds in fish larval cultivation.

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Marx Perfecto Garcia is an Aquaculturist II, the Farm Manager of the three Technology Outreach Stations and the National Stock Assessment Program (NSAP) Project Leader at the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources-Cordillera Administrative Region (BFAR-CAR). He obtained his B.Sc. in Fisheries degree and M.Sc. in Environmental Management at the Central Luzon State University. Mr. Garcia is a fishery research, extension and community development worker. He significantly works hands-on on research, extension as well as resource management. His skills and expertise include that in aquaculture and resource management.

Abstract:

The Amburayan River is one of the main river systems in the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR) covering the provinces of Benguet, La Union and Ilocos Sur. Aside from being a tourism site, it is the primary water source for agricultural lands along the stretch of the river. It also serves as a fishing ground to the residents because of its potential as habitat to native, endemic, migratory and indigenous fish and other aquatic organisms. Being a pathway to native, endemic and migratory species in the region, protecting the Amburayan River ecosystem and conserving its ecological integrity enhances its productivity. The assessment of fishing gears and practices used including the fish species caught by these gears is important in the management of the resources. This study on fishing gears and practices was done in three municipalities in Benguet namely; Atok, Kapangan and Kibungan. Fishing gears and practices were determined through interview with the locals in focus group discussions and direct observation during fishing. This study revealed that there are different fishing gears and practices being employed along the Amburayan River. Most of which are traditional knowledge-based and used depending on the season and location of fishing area.  Fishermen create and modify their gears according to the river structure, time of the year and target species. There are ten fishing gears classified into falling gear (cast net or tabukol), lift net (balchew/sagada), hook and line (banniit), fish traps (apayaw/apajaw, bagekbek/gubo, bukatot and salliang), drive-in net (kalaskas) and miscellaneous gears (spear gun and asar). There are also five fishing practices and methods (sarep/salep, sawil, tarangutong/tunuton/punupon, sillag, lu-luy) observed and two gear accessories (alat and salgat) were recorded.  Conducting regular assessment of the gears and species of the Amburayan River would help in the formulation of policies for conserving the river ecosystem.

Mary P. Tauli

Assistant Project Leader, BFAR-CAR, Phillippines

Title: ASAR: A Native Fishing Gear Used in the Cordillera Rivers
Speaker
Biography:

Ms. Mary P. Tauli is an Aquaculturist I and the National Stock Assessment Program (NSAP) Assistant Project Leader at the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources-Cordillera Administrative Region (BFAR-CAR). She obtained her B.Sc. in Fisheries degree at Central Luzon State University under the BFAR Fisheries Scholarship program. Upon completion of her degree, she proceeded to work as a research assistant at the Central Luzon State University- College of Fisheries. However, being an Igorot from the Cordilleras, her want to serve the people of her region led her to applying at the BFAR-CAR where she works up to now. 

Abstract:

The Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR), dubbed as the “Watershed Cradle of the North” caters to 13 major rivers, five of which are covered in the National Stock Assessment Program (NSAP) of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR). In CAR, a native fishing gear known as asar, asal or kileb is being used by fisherfolk. It is a passive and size selective but not species-selective fishing gear. It takes advantage of the increased volume of fish trapped during the rainy season. Data on the history and origin of the asar were obtained through interviews with fisherfolk in Abra, Kalinga, Benguet, Apayao and Ilocos Sur. Data on fish composition and volume of catch were collected by NSAP-CAR in six landing centers along the rivers of Amburayan, Abra and Apayao-ABulug. In Abra, asar was constructed based on basbasan - a tool used to separate rice grains from its stalk. In Benguet, it was based on an old practice of filtering decaying materials in rice fields called asal. In Apayao, asar was introduced by Mr. Manuel Basilio, an Abrenian who migrated to Flora in 1964. NSAP data shows that 26 species of aquatic animals were caught by asar in the Cordillera Rivers in 2015. Asar as a gear contributed 5.5% of total inland capture fisheries in the Cordillera in 2015.